Larry King dead at 87

Jozef_Tiso

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Larry was known to embellish. He once shot his mouth off about playing stick ball with Sandy Koufax of the LA Dodgers. Larry was laying it on pretty thick about "Two Jews from Brooklyn". Well, Larry had to come clean after Koufax revealed he never knew Larry when they were growing up. Opie and Anthony on Larry King.
Opie and Anthony - Larry King Misquoted Movie Lines. (1/2) - YouTube
 

CrackSmokeRepublican

An ancient story of Fhunter Xiden...and the pipe.
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Larry's family was connected with the Jewish Mobsters in NY/NJ. I always remember this quote:
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The Jewish Gangsters Who Beat Up American Nazis

Posted on July 6, 2018 in: Mosaic Magazine|Jump To Comments


The 1930s saw a proliferation of anti-Semitic groups in the U.S., many of which openly sympathized with Nazism and held mass rallies where they displayed swastikas and related symbols. While the Jewish establishment sought legal means to combat them, some Jews favored a more direct approach. Based on his interviews with Meyer Lansky and others, Robert Rockaway explains what that approach entailed:
Nathan Perlman, a judge and former Republican congressman, was one Jewish leader who believed that the Jews should demonstrate more militancy. In 1935, he surreptitiously contacted Meyer Lansky, a leading organized-crime figure born on the fourth of July, and asked him to help. . . . Perlman assured Lansky that money and legal assistance would be put at his disposal. The only stipulation was that no Nazis be killed. . . . Lansky reluctantly agreed. . . . Always very sensitive about anti-Semitism, Lansky was acutely aware of what the Nazis were doing to Jews [in Europe]. . . .
Lansky rounded up some of his tough associates and went around New York disrupting Nazi meetings. Young Jews not connected to him or to the rackets also volunteered to help, and Lansky and others taught them how to use their fists and handle themselves in a fight. Lansky’s crews worked very professionally. Nazi arms, legs, and ribs were broken and skulls cracked, but no one died. The attacks continued for more than a year. And Lansky earned quite a reputation for doing this work. . . .
Similar efforts were organized in Minneapolis, Newark, and elsewhere. Rockaway concludes:
What did Jewish communal leaders think about this? Publicly they evinced shame and horror at the criminal activities and notoriety of the gangsters because they epitomized the “bad Jew,” the evildoer who would bring hatred on the whole community. Privately they appreciated the mobsters who boldly took action against the Nazis and anti-Semites. Although the gangsters may have distressed the Jewish establishment, they did earn the admiration of the Jewish man-on-the-street, especially among Jewish youngsters.
The talk-show host Larry King admitted that when he was growing up in Brooklyn, “Jewish gangsters were our heroes. Even the bad ones were heroes to us.” The 1930s were a time fraught with danger for Jews. For some Jewish mobsters, it proved to be a time when they could do something positive to protect their community from Nazis and anti-Semites.
 

Saint Bridget

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Lawrence Harvey Zeiger
All from Wikipedia...
During this period, WIOD gave King further exposure as a color commentator for the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League, during their 1970 season and most of their 1971 season.[34] However, he was dismissed by both WIOD and television station WTVJ as a late-night radio host and sports commentator as of December 20, 1971, when he was arrested after being accused of grand larceny by a former business partner, Louis Wolfson.[35][36] Other staffers covered the Dolphins' games into their 24–3 loss to Dallas in Super Bowl VI. King also lost his weekly column at the Miami Beach Sun newspaper. The charges were dropped.[36] Eventually, King was rehired by WIOD.[36] For several years during the 1970s, he hosted a sports talk-show called "Sports-a-la-King" that featured guests and callers.[30]

Louis Wolfson


For the American author, see Louis Wolfson (writer).
Louis Elwood Wolfson (January 28, 1912 – December 30, 2007) was an American financier and one of the first modern corporate raiders, labeled by Time as such in a 1956 article.[1] Wolfson became a self-made millionaire before he was 29 years old. He is credited with creating the modern hostile tender offer, which laid the technical framework to the LBO. In later years he was a major thoroughbred horse racing participant best known as the owner and breeder of 1978 American Triple Crown winner, Affirmed.
Louis Wolfson
BornJanuary 28, 1912
St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.
DiedDecember 30, 2007(aged 95)
Bal Harbour, Florida, U.S.
OccupationBusinessman:
Financier
Racehorse owner/breeder
Philanthropist
Spouse(s)Florence Monsky (until her death)
Patrice Jacobs (until his death)
Children4, including Martin D. Wolfson
Wolfson was frequently in trouble with the law. In 1957 the United States Securities and Exchange Commission ordered a ten-day suspension of trading in stock in a company Wolfson held "To prevent fraudulent and manipulative practices". In 1967, he was convicted of selling unregistered shares and obstruction of justice for which he served nine months in a federal prison. The conviction eventually led to a scandal involving Supreme Court Justice Abe Fortas, who resigned in 1969 after returning a $20,000 retainer to a Wolfson foundation.[2][3][4] In 1971, Wolfson was involved in a contentous legal battle with radio host Larry King over monies Wolfson supplied and King allegedly pocketed. Later King claimed Wolfson paid him $48,500 to influence President Richard Nixon's incoming US Attorney General, John N. Mitchell, into reviewing Wolfson's past conviction.[5][6]

Contents


Early lifeEdit

Wolfson was born in St. Louis, Missouri,[7] but his family moved to Jacksonville, Florida, when he was one year old.[8]
The child of Jewish immigrants from Lithuania, Wolfson and his seven siblings grew up in Jacksonville, where his father was a junk man/scrap metal dealer.[5] In his teens, he boxedprofessio
In 1971, Wolfson was in the news again. He filed a complaint against Larry King—then a Miami radio host, later a CNN personality—for allegedly pocketing $5,000, part of a $25,000 payment destined for New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison, who was investigating President John F. Kennedy's assassination. King was arrested for grand-larceny, but the original criminal charges were dismissed because King's attorney had been able to delay the criminal court process until the statute of limitations had run out. While a judge subsequently threw out the charge, King pled no contest to one count of passing bad checks.[20][21] King was fired from WIOD after Wolfson wrote to TV and radio executives at WTVJ & WIOD claiming that King was "a menace to the public", and that his employers should pay for King's "treatment in a mental institution for six months so he can do no further harm in this community or any other."

Wolfson and King had been friends until King later admitted that he had tricked Wolfson, a second time, into giving him $48,500 to influence President Richard Nixon's incoming US Attorney General, John N. Mitchell, into reviewing Wolfson's past conviction.[5][6]

He was a dirty criminal mental jew.
 

Iconoclast

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Larry's family was connected with the Jewish Mobsters in NY/NJ. I always remember this quote:
------

The Jewish Gangsters Who Beat Up American Nazis

Posted on July 6, 2018 in: Mosaic Magazine|Jump To Comments


The 1930s saw a proliferation of anti-Semitic groups in the U.S., many of which openly sympathized with Nazism and held mass rallies where they displayed swastikas and related symbols. While the Jewish establishment sought legal means to combat them, some Jews favored a more direct approach. Based on his interviews with Meyer Lansky and others, Robert Rockaway explains what that approach entailed:

Similar efforts were organized in Minneapolis, Newark, and elsewhere. Rockaway concludes:
WTF is he talking about the 1930s like he knew anything about it, he was a mostly baby and toddler in the 1930s for god's sake, being born in 1933.
 
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