Italy: Fags & Hoes Literally Shaking As Fascist Successor Party On Track To Win Most Seats In Parliamentary Elections This Weekend

CMcGillicutty

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They of course do not identify as fascists anymore and have adopted a more pragmatic, optical line on a lot of issues. But the Brothers of Italy (naval blue in the graph below) are the direct heirs of the Italian Social Movement, a neo-fascist party created in Italy by the surviving loyalists of the Mussolini government after WWII; Brothers of Italy still uses the same red, white and green flame symbol as the ISM as you can see in the photos below.

Unless they go full Brandon and do mass voter fraud, it's looking good. Polls show support collapsing for the Italian democrat party (red); BOI are of course allied with Salvini's Lega party (Green), and Silvio Berlusconi's conservative party (light blue). The idiotic five star movement (yellow) has pretty much petered out and will not be able to be the treacherous power brokers they were in the last session of parliament:

Opinion_Polls_Italy_General_Election_2022.svg (1).png

Italy elections: Far-right Meloni scents power in a divided country
By Mark Lowen
BBC Rome correspondent

    • Published
      10 hours ago

BallarΓ² market in Palermo

The far right has surged ahead in Sicily, despite a lack of appetite for politics

Elections may be around the corner, but at the BallarΓ² market in the Sicilian capital of Palermo, the passions are not political but culinary.

Calls ring out from traders slicing fresh calamari or tempting passers-by with the delicious local speciality: arancini, or fried balls of rice and meat.

But there is little appetite for politicians here. Wandering through the narrow stalls, most of those we asked said they would not vote in the election next Sunday: disappointment, disillusionment, and dishonesty were the words we heard repeatedly.

Piling up ripe oranges and pomegranates outside her cafe, Sonia Capizzi was a rare exception: she has boycotted elections until now, but this time is different.

"I can see things are changing and it's down to Giorgia Meloni," she says, referencing the leader of the far-right Brothers of Italy party, who tops the opinion polls.

"She's drawing me in because she's a woman, a mum, and has grit and charisma."

Sonia Capizzi

BBC
In Italy's last election in 2018, her party scored less than 4% in Sicily - just behind what she garnered nationally - while the populist, anti-establishment Five Star Movement came top with almost 50% of the vote here.

Four years on, Brothers of Italy have soared ahead, with the right-wing coalition it leads now scenting victory.

Ms Meloni, 45, could well become Italy's first female prime minister - and the country's first far-right leader since Benito Mussolini.

Giorgia Meloni of Fratelli d'Italia political party, member of right-wing coalition speaks to supporters in turin, Italy.
IMAGE
Giorgia Meloni aims to lead a coalition of right-wing parties

Her promises of tax cuts and a hard line on immigration are gaining considerable support here. But her pledge to scrap a flagship Five Star policy, the citizens' income - a social welfare system for those below the poverty line - splits opinion.

The poorer south of Italy has benefited from it most and it is still a vote-winner for Five Star. But some, like Sonia Capizzi, follow Ms Meloni's line that the policy has overburdened the state. "With the handout, people are just staying at home and not working," says the cafe-owner. "The government should have created jobs instead."

That is a view also echoed on the outskirts of Palermo, in the deprived Zen neighbourhood. The area is one of Europe's most impoverished, where unemployment is at 50%, and at 80% among the youth.

Palermo's Zen neighbourhood

Palermo's Zen neighbourhood is among the poorest in Europe

Between their tightly packed apartment blocks, Domenico Finocchio and Piero Gambino peer at a field strewn with litter and broken glass. Beside it lie burnt-out cars and charred rubbish bins. Both men voted for Five Star in the last election but now say they will cast their ballot for Giorgia Meloni.

"We want this area to be cleaned up so it's safer at night," says Domenico. "You can't even get rid of the rubbish because it's swarming with rats."


Domenico Finocchio (R) and Piero Gambino

Both Piero (L) and Domenico have switched allegiance to Brothers of Italy

"We hoped Five Star would change things", says Piero, "but they were all talk and no action and there are still no jobs. We feel very abandoned - and we hope Meloni will fix things."

But Italy is as divided as it is diverse.

Across the country, in the northern city of Modena, plates of the local speciality, tortellini - pasta stuffed with meat - are being served up at the Festa de l'UnitΓ , the annual festival of the centre-left. And here, the politics is of a very different taste to Meloni-land.

Barbara Rosi

Barbara Rosi sees Brothers of Italy as a return to the fascist past

Speeches and debates focus on everything from education to the war in Ukraine, and talk over dinner is about how to stop Italy swinging to the far right.

"I'm very worried about Giorgia Meloni - she's the worst idea of a woman I could have," says Barbara Rosi, a marketing manager who has come with her family. "I'm worried she could touch our human rights, especially abortion. She represents the past for me - fascism - and she wants to bring it back."

The Brothers of Italy leader vehemently rejects the fascist label, stating recently that it had been "consigned to history".

But her party has neo-fascist roots, its flame symbol has been interpreted by some as the fire on Mussolini's tomb, and a video emerged last year of some party members making fascist salutes.

What is clearer in Meloni's political programme is her social conservatism, particularly her opposition to same-sex families. "Yes to the natural family, no to LGBT lobbies!" she roared at a recent rally of Spain's far-right party Vox.

That strikes fear into the hearts of Christian De Florio and Carlo Tumino, fathers of four-year-old twin boys through an American surrogate. While the children build Lego in the kitchen, they tell me of their despair at what they call Meloni's attempts "to erase families like ours".


Carlo (2nd from L) with husband Christian (R) and their two children

Carlo Tumino (2nd L) and husband Christian are worried by the prospect of a Meloni-led government

"Her strategy is to define enemies," says Carlo. "Gay people like us, transsexuals and immigrants are enemies - and I don't like this way of expressing herself. She always seems angry with people that don't represent her idea of society. But I think in this society, there should be a place for everyone. That is democracy."

Italy's democracy is firmly entrenched but has somehow constantly seemed unsure of which direction it should take. This political laboratory invented fascism, elected a billionaire property tycoon and media mogul in Silvio Berlusconi two decades before Donald Trump, tried anti-establishment populism, technocrat governments, and now perhaps looks set to elect a far-right prime minister.

In its constant search for a political identity, Italy is again trying something new, hoping perhaps it will finally bring change. But many here worry that the leap into the unknown could well turn out to be a very dark ride.

 

Panzerhund

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I hope she is reaching out to casapound
 

Vilis_Hāzners

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Italy's democracy is firmly entrenched but has somehow constantly seemed unsure of which direction it should take.
As all fake and ghey things are want to do.
 

Christopher

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"Her strategy is to define enemies," says Carlo. "Gay people like us, transsexuals and immigrants are enemies - and I don't like this way of expressing herself.
First of all: What makes this pig think immigrants want to be classified with gays and travesties??? Or vice versa? Second, a vote is an expression of confidence or support versus no-confidence and no support in government - where do you get the nerve to tell anybody else what their "expression" is, whatsoever??? and Thirdly, "defining enemies" is standard mental equipment and if this pig doesn't like it, that's too damn bad.
 

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BillyRayJenkins

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They of course do not identify as fascists anymore and have adopted a more pragmatic, optical line on a lot of issues. But the Brothers of Italy (naval blue in the graph below) are the direct heirs of the Italian Social Movement, a neo-fascist party created in Italy by the surviving loyalists of the Mussolini government after WWII; Brothers of Italy still uses the same red, white and green flame symbol as the ISM as you can see in the photos below.

Unless they go full Brandon and do mass voter fraud, it's looking good. Polls show support collapsing for the Italian democrat party (red); BOI are of course allied with Salvini's Lega party (Green), and Silvio Berlusconi's conservative party (light blue). The idiotic five star movement (yellow) has pretty much petered out and will not be able to be the treacherous power brokers they were in the last session of parliament:

View attachment 118494

Italy elections: Far-right Meloni scents power in a divided country
By Mark Lowen
BBC Rome correspondent

    • Published
      10 hours ago

BallarΓ² market in Palermo

The far right has surged ahead in Sicily, despite a lack of appetite for politics

Elections may be around the corner, but at the BallarΓ² market in the Sicilian capital of Palermo, the passions are not political but culinary.

Calls ring out from traders slicing fresh calamari or tempting passers-by with the delicious local speciality: arancini, or fried balls of rice and meat.

But there is little appetite for politicians here. Wandering through the narrow stalls, most of those we asked said they would not vote in the election next Sunday: disappointment, disillusionment, and dishonesty were the words we heard repeatedly.

Piling up ripe oranges and pomegranates outside her cafe, Sonia Capizzi was a rare exception: she has boycotted elections until now, but this time is different.

"I can see things are changing and it's down to Giorgia Meloni," she says, referencing the leader of the far-right Brothers of Italy party, who tops the opinion polls.

"She's drawing me in because she's a woman, a mum, and has grit and charisma."

Sonia Capizzi

BBC

In Italy's last election in 2018, her party scored less than 4% in Sicily - just behind what she garnered nationally - while the populist, anti-establishment Five Star Movement came top with almost 50% of the vote here.

Four years on, Brothers of Italy have soared ahead, with the right-wing coalition it leads now scenting victory.

Ms Meloni, 45, could well become Italy's first female prime minister - and the country's first far-right leader since Benito Mussolini.

Giorgia Meloni of Fratelli d'Italia political party, member of right-wing coalition speaks to supporters in turin, Italy.'Italia political party, member of right-wing coalition speaks to supporters in turin, Italy.
IMAGE
Giorgia Meloni aims to lead a coalition of right-wing parties

Her promises of tax cuts and a hard line on immigration are gaining considerable support here. But her pledge to scrap a flagship Five Star policy, the citizens' income - a social welfare system for those below the poverty line - splits opinion.

The poorer south of Italy has benefited from it most and it is still a vote-winner for Five Star. But some, like Sonia Capizzi, follow Ms Meloni's line that the policy has overburdened the state. "With the handout, people are just staying at home and not working," says the cafe-owner. "The government should have created jobs instead."

That is a view also echoed on the outskirts of Palermo, in the deprived Zen neighbourhood. The area is one of Europe's most impoverished, where unemployment is at 50%, and at 80% among the youth.

Palermo's Zen neighbourhood's Zen neighbourhood

Palermo's Zen neighbourhood is among the poorest in Europe

Between their tightly packed apartment blocks, Domenico Finocchio and Piero Gambino peer at a field strewn with litter and broken glass. Beside it lie burnt-out cars and charred rubbish bins. Both men voted for Five Star in the last election but now say they will cast their ballot for Giorgia Meloni.

"We want this area to be cleaned up so it's safer at night," says Domenico. "You can't even get rid of the rubbish because it's swarming with rats."


Domenico Finocchio (R) and Piero Gambino

Both Piero (L) and Domenico have switched allegiance to Brothers of Italy

"We hoped Five Star would change things", says Piero, "but they were all talk and no action and there are still no jobs. We feel very abandoned - and we hope Meloni will fix things."

But Italy is as divided as it is diverse.

Across the country, in the northern city of Modena, plates of the local speciality, tortellini - pasta stuffed with meat - are being served up at the Festa de l'UnitΓ , the annual festival of the centre-left. And here, the politics is of a very different taste to Meloni-land.

Barbara Rosi

Barbara Rosi sees Brothers of Italy as a return to the fascist past

Speeches and debates focus on everything from education to the war in Ukraine, and talk over dinner is about how to stop Italy swinging to the far right.

"I'm very worried about Giorgia Meloni - she's the worst idea of a woman I could have," says Barbara Rosi, a marketing manager who has come with her family. "I'm worried she could touch our human rights, especially abortion. She represents the past for me - fascism - and she wants to bring it back."

The Brothers of Italy leader vehemently rejects the fascist label, stating recently that it had been "consigned to history".

But her party has neo-fascist roots, its flame symbol has been interpreted by some as the fire on Mussolini's tomb, and a video emerged last year of some party members making fascist salutes.

What is clearer in Meloni's political programme is her social conservatism, particularly her opposition to same-sex families. "Yes to the natural family, no to LGBT lobbies!" she roared at a recent rally of Spain's far-right party Vox.

That strikes fear into the hearts of Christian De Florio and Carlo Tumino, fathers of four-year-old twin boys through an American surrogate. While the children build Lego in the kitchen, they tell me of their despair at what they call Meloni's attempts "to erase families like ours".


Carlo (2nd from L) with husband Christian (R) and their two children

Carlo Tumino (2nd L) and husband Christian are worried by the prospect of a Meloni-led government

"Her strategy is to define enemies," says Carlo. "Gay people like us, transsexuals and immigrants are enemies - and I don't like this way of expressing herself. She always seems angry with people that don't represent her idea of society. But I think in this society, there should be a place for everyone. That is democracy."

Italy's democracy is firmly entrenched but has somehow constantly seemed unsure of which direction it should take. This political laboratory invented fascism, elected a billionaire property tycoon and media mogul in Silvio Berlusconi two decades before Donald Trump, tried anti-establishment populism, technocrat governments, and now perhaps looks set to elect a far-right prime minister.

In its constant search for a political identity, Italy is again trying something new, hoping perhaps it will finally bring change. But many here worry that the leap into the unknown could well turn out to be a very dark ride.

God only give us another Benito. People forget if not for Benito winning in 1922 and lending moral support and actually giving shelter to German political refugees at times, it would have been more difficult for Uncle Adolf to rise to power. It could be said what Mussolini started, Uncle Adolf finished.
 

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Quote of the year for this journalist.
Like, no shit. I keep holding out hope that one of these NPC journalist's heads will explode from the effects of cognitive dissonance like that guy from Scanners, but it never happens. Sometimes, one of them has a stroke from the effects of the vaxx, but that's basically a booby prize by comparison.
 

letsgobackto1995

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The only thing to expect from the mythical "right wing woman" single mommy Meloni is more female empowerment, which is the very last thing Italy needs more of. Recall that she just recently supported a re-trial for a rape hoax where the man was acquitted.

However, she also brings along an alliance of Berlusconi and Salvini, and this is where it gets very interesting.
 

Panzerhund

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