I am becoming a blacksmith

Ethan_Allen

Well-known member
Old World Underground
🐸 Citizen of the Internet 🐸
β°β˜•πŸš¬πŸš½πŸšΏπŸͺ’

I wish you the best. Fun to watch, interesting indeed, and no doubt a very useful skill, but that's too hot, and hard of a damn job for me. I like my desk and my A/C, TYVM. But in a SHTF scenario, you'll have a useful skill.
 
Last edited:

xXxAnglicanxXx

Hell is real, and we're in it.
Old World Underground
🐸 Citizen of the Internet 🐸
β°β˜•πŸš¬πŸš½πŸšΏπŸͺ’
I've managed to heat up some iron and hammer it out, but atm I need to figure out a better way of heating up the metal so it doesn't take so long. The crank blower I got sucks ass.
 

phoenixrising

patiently awaiting the coofpocalypse
Old World Underground
🐸 Citizen of the Internet 🐸
β°β˜•πŸš¬πŸš½πŸšΏπŸͺ’πŸ‹πŸ»
It's gonna be epic.
View attachment 52873
Can I have advice? Is there anything you can tell me to give me a head start? Maybe things to avoid doing? I want to make knives and spearheads at first to get a feel for smithing. Then I want to experiment with more advanced techniques.

I've already ordered a crank blower and am looking for an anvil, but I think a cinder block will work for now just until I get a proper surface to work on.
As has already been said, cinder block anvil is a bad idea. Find a length of rail line, or even better a forklift Tyne. When you do buy an anvil, mass is king (as well as working surface rebound/hardness), 350-400lbs is ideal for decorative architectural type projects. My anvil and stand weighs in at about 300lbs and I wish I had bigger. Down the track you'll want to look at building or buying a hydraulic forging press to speed up production and save wear and tear on your joints. With a bit of patience, hydraulic components can be had fairly cheap, or even a whole press setup.
 

Seb

Too cool for badges and titles
Old World Underground
🐸 Citizen of the Internet 🐸
β°β˜•πŸš¬πŸš½πŸšΏ
I've managed to heat up some iron and hammer it out, but atm I need to figure out a better way of heating up the metal so it doesn't take so long. The crank blower I got sucks ass.
See if there's a potter near you that would sell a kiln cheaply, or if s/he has refractory kiln bricks that you can have.
 

Vilis_Hāzners

卐卐卐 - RACE AND NATION FIRST - 卐卐卐
Old World Underground
πŸ‘‘
🐸 Citizen of the Internet 🐸
🎩
β°β˜•πŸš¬πŸš½πŸšΏπŸͺ’πŸ‹πŸ»πŸ₯“πŸ’»β›ͺ️
Has anyone recommended a Tungsten Anvil? It can stay Solid even after reaching the boiling point of iron, and it's the strongest metal on Earth.
If the best anvils are over 100 years old, sought after more than gold and will cost you fat cash.
 

Enwar

Well-known member
🐸 Citizen of the Internet 🐸
β°β˜•πŸš¬πŸš½πŸšΏπŸͺ’πŸ‹πŸ»πŸ₯“πŸ’»
Are you becoming an apprentice?
 

Al_Bundy

A fat jewess walks into the shoe store....
Old World Underground
🐸 Citizen of the Internet 🐸
β°β˜•πŸš¬πŸš½πŸšΏπŸͺ’πŸ‹πŸ»πŸ₯“
Let us all know how this goes because I plan on doing the same next year.
 

Al_Bundy

A fat jewess walks into the shoe store....
Old World Underground
🐸 Citizen of the Internet 🐸
β°β˜•πŸš¬πŸš½πŸšΏπŸͺ’πŸ‹πŸ»πŸ₯“

xXxAnglicanxXx

Hell is real, and we're in it.
Old World Underground
🐸 Citizen of the Internet 🐸
β°β˜•πŸš¬πŸš½πŸšΏπŸͺ’
I wanted to exert myself, so I used a handcrank blower instead. But you can totally do this.

I recommend getting a pipe with some kind of corner piece fitted to it so you can blow the air up into the charcoal. That'll get it right where the air needs to go. Then create some sort of structure with it. I'm trying this out tomorrow-- will take pictures.
 

Astral-Pepe

Behind Enemy Lines
Old World Underground
πŸ‘‘
🐸 Citizen of the Internet 🐸
🎩
β°β˜•πŸš¬πŸš½πŸšΏπŸͺ’πŸ‹πŸ»πŸ₯“
I did a blacksmithing thread on the old bbs. Too bad that's gone because I dealt with everything you need to get started. I even showed, step by step, how to make a basic anvil out of a section of railroad track using an angle grinder and cold chisels. I also built a propane forge in that thread and dealt with how to make basic blacksmith tools, such as tongs.

Your first step should be building a good forge, then an anvil and then some tools.

A cinder block won't work as an anvil. It pretty much has to be steel. I've seen people use all kinds of things as anvils; sections of large I-beams, blocks of steel, large machine parts etc.

I'm super busy right now but I'll try to dig up some pics of my setup and the tools I made. I have a 500ish-lb anvil that was made in 1820 or 1840 or something like that. I bought it years ago from an old guy who told me it was old when he was a kid.
 

Vilis_Hāzners

卐卐卐 - RACE AND NATION FIRST - 卐卐卐
Old World Underground
πŸ‘‘
🐸 Citizen of the Internet 🐸
🎩
β°β˜•πŸš¬πŸš½πŸšΏπŸͺ’πŸ‹πŸ»πŸ₯“πŸ’»β›ͺ️
I did a blacksmithing thread on the old bbs. Too bad that's gone because I dealt with everything you need to get started. I even showed, step by step, how to make a basic anvil out of a section of railroad track using an angle grinder and cold chisels. I also built a propane forge in that thread and dealt with how to make basic blacksmith tools, such as tongs.

Your first step should be building a good forge, then an anvil and then some tools.

A cinder block won't work as an anvil. It pretty much has to be steel. I've seen people use all kinds of things as anvils; sections of large I-beams, blocks of steel, large machine parts etc.

I'm super busy right now but I'll try to dig up some pics of my setup and the tools I made. I have a 500ish-lb anvil that was made in 1820 or 1840 or something like that. I bought it years ago from an old guy who told me it was old when he was a kid.
I remember that thread.

Man, I miss the old BBS...
 

Astral-Pepe

Behind Enemy Lines
Old World Underground
πŸ‘‘
🐸 Citizen of the Internet 🐸
🎩
β°β˜•πŸš¬πŸš½πŸšΏπŸͺ’πŸ‹πŸ»πŸ₯“
I've managed to heat up some iron and hammer it out, but atm I need to figure out a better way of heating up the metal so it doesn't take so long. The crank blower I got sucks ass.
You're going to have to get a better setup than what you have.

Build something like this:



Is there a scrap yard near your house? If so put on some work boots and go out there and see if you can find something to use as a firepot. A brake drum from a large truck is perfect. Ask the guys working there to find you one and tell them what it's for.

You will also need a heavy piece of steel that's big enough to cover the hole in the bottom of the brake drum so you can attach it to the rest of your assembly and cut slots in it for the air to blow through. The steel should be 1/2" thick. The guys at the scrap yard may have something the right size lying around.

This is a pretty good diagram:



All the pipe parts are just steel plumbing tubing that you can get at the hardware store. You need a t-pipe, a flange and some short nipples. An end cap can be used on the ash dump (bottom) if you don't want to construct a proper ash dump. Just open it once in a while to let the slag and ash fall out.

You can use a hair dryer as a blower but use one that has a cold setting because it will overheat quickly and use a lot of power if it is blowing hot all the time. You can hook the hair dryer up to a rheostat to control the flow better but that isn't really necessary.

Find a chunk of rail track or a big piece of steel beam for an anvil. If you go with a rail track don't worry about the top of it not being flat or being pitted. I've seen some guys on YouTube making a huge mess and wasting an entire day trying to get a rail track anvil to be flat on top. I have a couple of rail track anvils and I use them for all kinds of shaping and forging operations; they are good enough for you to get started on.

You can use vice grips for tongs to start out but the first tools you should learn how to make is tongs. You just need bar stock and a punch to make a hole. Like I said, I'm busy right now but I'll dig up some good instructions on how to make tongs for you.
 
Last edited:

MeanMaster

Well-known member
Cave Beast
🐸 Citizen of the Internet 🐸
β°β˜•πŸš¬πŸš½πŸšΏπŸͺ’
Making charcoal yourself is fun and easy. It is also a cheap source of clean burning fuel that can be duel purposed when it's time to make hotdogs and hamburgers at the family picnic. Easy way to impress the uncle's too.
 

Astral-Pepe

Behind Enemy Lines
Old World Underground
πŸ‘‘
🐸 Citizen of the Internet 🐸
🎩
β°β˜•πŸš¬πŸš½πŸšΏπŸͺ’πŸ‹πŸ»πŸ₯“
I'm having a hard time finding the diagram I want to show you about how to make tongs so I'll just talk you through it. It really is very simple to make flat jaw tongs. You can make them from round stock, flat stock or square stock. Whatever you can get your hands on at first will be good enough. You can even use rebar which you can find lying around at construction sites and other places. It is cheap as dirt.





Traditionally you would do all the work with the forge and anvil but since you're starting out you may want to do the bending with a vice to get it just right and you may want to drill the holes instead of punching them.

Basically the area where the two side will connect (this is called the joint) must be flat and both parts of the tongs should be as identical as possible.

Next, flatten the jaw area in the opposite plane as the joint and work the flattened part so that the back of it is flush with the rest of the handle while the other side projects. All of this you will have to do on the anvil. It's good practice for flattening and straightening parts so try making a few pairs of tongs.

Your parts should look like the center image here:



You can drill the hole out rather than punch it. Remember to go slow when drilling steel and use cutting oil. If your bit gets too hot it will lose it's hardness and it won't cut steel anymore. You should be getting nice spirals of steel coming out of the drill hole or at least a steady flow of steel bits. Stop and drip some oil in there while you're doing it and remember: go slow.

Make a pin out of some round stock, a big nail will work. Cut it just a tiny bit longer than it needs to be. Connect the two sides of your tongs with the pin and then peen the pin so the ends are like mushroom tops. Use a ball peen hammer and the anvil for this.
 

Seb

Too cool for badges and titles
Old World Underground
🐸 Citizen of the Internet 🐸
β°β˜•πŸš¬πŸš½πŸšΏ

Astral-Pepe

Behind Enemy Lines
Old World Underground
πŸ‘‘
🐸 Citizen of the Internet 🐸
🎩
β°β˜•πŸš¬πŸš½πŸšΏπŸͺ’πŸ‹πŸ»πŸ₯“
Why not just use a punch then?
I would always punch steel but Anglican is a noob so he may want to drill the holes rather than trying to punch them. Its a bit of setting up to get the punch just right and centered over the pritchel.



It can seem like a three handed operation when you're just starting out. When I have to do something really precise I usually use a hold down or a big section of drive chain to hold the piece in place while I punch.



He should really learn how to do this but he may not have a proper anvil to do it on just yet.
 

JasonVorhees

Well-known member
Cave Beast
🐸 Citizen of the Internet 🐸
β°β˜•πŸš¬πŸš½πŸšΏπŸͺ’
Absolute treason, becoming a Smith of the Blacks, smdh
 

Jebal_Dokundy

used to be Yodocq on old BBS
Old World Underground
🐸 Citizen of the Internet 🐸
β°β˜•πŸš¬πŸš½πŸšΏπŸͺ’
It's gonna be epic.
View attachment 52873
Can I have advice? Is there anything you can tell me to give me a head start? Maybe things to avoid doing? I want to make knives and spearheads at first to get a feel for smithing. Then I want to experiment with more advanced techniques.

I've already ordered a crank blower and am looking for an anvil, but I think a cinder block will work for now just until I get a proper surface to work on.
First things first:
Get a Master. You ain't gonna learn shit from those idiotic tubes where every asshole with swagger pretends he's one. When you'll find one, don't be cocky and obey, don't be shy to bow down in front of him and most of the time - shut up and listen.
Learn how to sharpen spiral drill bits, youngsters always suck considering this.
Learn how to heat up stuff properly, how to anneal, how to harden.
Learn how to use fire properly, youngsters suck on it too, even after 5years of practice and tons of coal burned.
Expert knows which steel is which just by dropping such bar on concrete floor - it has different ring when there is higher carbon content.
Never use old, black engine oil for hardening your steels, it's idiotic (doesn't work well, but some morons use it anyway, don't be one) and its fumes are highly cancerous. It's also highly flammable and dangerous cuz of that.
If you cannot afford real, proper oil for hardening, get vegetable one for french fries and mix it 3 to 1 with new mineral oil for engines.
There are some steels which can be hardened and tempered using water, never use tap water.
Rain water is superior to that and then older, than better it works.
Best is old, rusty rainwater of about temperature of human body or bit higher, but not warm. Never get rid of such old water, it's treasury on it's own.
Never use icy cold water, materials will crack.
Learn all about theory of steel, you should be familiar with austenite, martensite, cementite and what it means.

It will take you on path which is highly addictive and first ten years you will be like baby learning steps and those steps will be full of suffering and frustration how shitty your work looks.
Don't lie to yourself like many others, first few years it will literally look like shit.

Second decade - well, in case you still on it - your work will look better, but you will still have plenty to learn and huge window for improvement (I'm talking full time job here, hobby smith will never learn sufficient knowledge even in half of the century).

And in third decade within such craft, you may or may not (depends on person, really) realize you posses God-like powers in comparison with ordinary folks (you will KNOW, instantly) and they may bow to you and will treat you like hero from the old legends, treat you FINALLY with utmost respect and you may command good prices for your works.

But it can cost you greatly, because it is basically hermitage, long hours in workshop, divorces are highly probable and not many women can stand all that dirt of creation and your sweaty smell while are you at it.

So be warned, it's undeniably thorny path, full of pain and suffering. But it's worth it I guess.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Seb
Top