Gardening/Homesteading/Farming/Permaculture

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Northwestguy

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This year I tried growing carrots for the first time. I had a lot of learning to do.

What I learned was that it is a bad idea to be lazy. Well I already knew that... but when it comes to carrots it's better to put in a lot of work during the planting rather than even more down the line.

I did neither. I planted my carrots like a slob, throwing around seeds all over the place. And I refrained from thinning them out later! The carrots grew very close to each other. I only had a handful of normal sized carrots - the rest were small. Small carrots are no fun. Not only are they smaller but there's more of them. More carrots means more work during harvest. I'd very much rather deal with 1 big carrot than 10 small ones.

20200907_004801.jpg
A quarter of my carrots from my raised bed and the sorted carrot greens that will be dried and used like parsley

I had to spend around 3 hours sorting through those carrots... and that's not even most of them!
 
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anti-barabas-ite

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This year I tried growing carrots for the first time. I had a lot of learning to do.

What I learned was that it is bad idea to be lazy. Well I already knew that... but when it comes to carrots it's better to put in a lot of work during the planting rather than even more down the line.

I did neither. I planted my carrots like a slob, throwing around seeds all over the place. And I refrained from thinning them out later! The carrots grew very close to each other. I only had a handful of normal sized carrots - the rest were small. Small carrots are no fun. Not only are they smaller but there's more of them. More carrots means more work during harvest. I'd very much rather deal with 1 big carrot than 10 small ones.

View attachment 21609
A quarter of my carrots from my raised bed and the sorted carrot greens that will be dried and used like parsley

I had to spend around 3 hours sorting through those carrots... and that's not even most of them!
name the " organic baby carrots" charge double.
I say great job getting carrots!
 

Seamus McHermit

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This year I tried growing carrots for the first time. I had a lot of learning to do.

What I learned was that it is a bad idea to be lazy. Well I already knew that... but when it comes to carrots it's better to put in a lot of work during the planting rather than even more down the line.

I did neither. I planted my carrots like a slob, throwing around seeds all over the place. And I refrained from thinning them out later! The carrots grew very close to each other. I only had a handful of normal sized carrots - the rest were small. Small carrots are no fun. Not only are they smaller but there's more of them. More carrots means more work during harvest. I'd very much rather deal with 1 big carrot than 10 small ones.

View attachment 21609
A quarter of my carrots from my raised bed and the sorted carrot greens that will be dried and used like parsley

I had to spend around 3 hours sorting through those carrots... and that's not even most of them!
Carrots are a bitch, no two ways around it. They’re sensitive little seeds, hard to germinate, hate weed competition, and like you found out, have to be continuously thinned up until harvest. A little tip is to thin out the biggest ones, which seems counterintuitive because you’d think you’d want to keep the bigger stronger ones and thin the weak little ones, but the big ones are useable for eating even at a young age, and the little ones will catch up and grow on to full size.

They sure are tasty though, so I still grow them. I recommend diversifying into lots of turnips and radishes in addition to carrots, to fulfill your root crop needs and not have as many headaches as trying to rely on just carrots.
 

Astral-Pepe

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Black locust is the ultimate here. The young ones are horrifically thorny, they grow incredibly fast, and they can easily be coppiced into a low hedge of nasty thorns.
I've got those here, they may be honey locusts too IDK. They're very fast growing and I simply left them to grow along my fence line and in other places I'm trying to discourage deer from entering.

Great thread BTW. I just got back yesterday from dealing with some emergency work and my garden/greenhouse is kind of a mess. I won't post any pics because its embarrassing. My eldest son and my sister were left in charge of the place while I was gone and they didn't really take it seriously.

I have a ton of corn, tomatoes, kale (the kale is huge, I've never seen anything like it), yellow beans, collards, Swiss chard, lettuce, carrots, cabbage (red and green), squash, pumpkins (the squash and pumpkins seem to all have bugs and worms eating them so I just toss them to the chickens), peppers (red, green and some varieties of hot peppers), a bunch of other things that I'm forgetting right now and a nice variety of herbs (my Greek basil, which is purple, grew really well - very hardy species that overcomes weeds).

Anyway I have a ton of work to do to weed everything and salvage my harvest.

What's your advice on post-harvest? Should I put the chickens in the garden and let them pillage what's left? Should I burn the weeds and everything in there? Should I cover the ground with something (plywood, cardboard etc.) to keep the weeds down for next year?

The gardening/farming/homesteading community were building here is as important as anything else so thanks for keeping it going. I'm making notes on how things went this year and what worked and what failed for me. I'll get some pics and post something in here later.
 

Seamus McHermit

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What's your advice on post-harvest? Should I put the chickens in the garden and let them pillage what's left? Should I burn the weeds and everything in there? Should I cover the ground with something (plywood, cardboard etc.) to keep the weeds down for next year?
I wouldn’t burn the stuff, but either other option is fine. Tarping it over is the easier option.

What I do is cut everything off at ground level, leaving the roots to decompose in the ground, and haul all the leftover vegetation/stalks/etc to the chicken pen for them to pick through and break down. In the early spring, I’ll haul this composted garden trash back to the garden and apply it as a mulch layer. I find that this does a better job of breaking the tough stuff down, like corn stalks and whatnot, and I’d prefer to keep the chickens out of the garden, so they don’t dig all my beds up, fuck up my mulch pathways, eat all the earthworms, etc. It’s easier to take the garden scraps to them rather than let them do their destruction, because their pen is intentionally 10 feet away from the garden.
 

Astral-Pepe

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keep the chickens out of the garden, so they don’t dig all my beds up, fuck up my mulch pathways, eat all the earthworms, etc.
Yeah, that makes sense.

I guess I'll just blast it all with the brush saw and haul it over to the chickens. Thanks brother.
 

CryCzech

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I'm envious of all you people who have a wide variety of options for crops/growing seasons. I'm in the desert and we only have a small window in the winter to grow vegetables. It's too hot in the summer, even if you're vegetables are shaded. Good location for fruit trees! Banana trees are going crazy this year, and I have grapefruit, mandarin orange, peach, pomegranate, figs, black sapote and pecan. Planted an apple tree last year and it's still small but doing fine. Lost avocado and persimmon trees last year because we were gone some of the summer and the person watching out home didn't water.
 

anti-barabas-ite

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I've got those here, they may be honey locusts too IDK. They're very fast growing and I simply left them to grow along my fence line and in other places I'm trying to discourage deer from entering.

Great thread BTW. I just got back yesterday from dealing with some emergency work and my garden/greenhouse is kind of a mess. I won't post any pics because its embarrassing. My eldest son and my sister were left in charge of the place while I was gone and they didn't really take it seriously.

I have a ton of corn, tomatoes, kale (the kale is huge, I've never seen anything like it), yellow beans, collards, Swiss chard, lettuce, carrots, cabbage (red and green), squash, pumpkins (the squash and pumpkins seem to all have bugs and worms eating them so I just toss them to the chickens), peppers (red, green and some varieties of hot peppers), a bunch of other things that I'm forgetting right now and a nice variety of herbs (my Greek basil, which is purple, grew really well - very hardy species that overcomes weeds).

Anyway I have a ton of work to do to weed everything and salvage my harvest.

What's your advice on post-harvest? Should I put the chickens in the garden and let them pillage what's left? Should I burn the weeds and everything in there? Should I cover the ground with something (plywood, cardboard etc.) to keep the weeds down for next year?

The gardening/farming/homesteading community were building here is as important as anything else so thanks for keeping it going. I'm making notes on how things went this year and what worked and what failed for me. I'll get some pics and post something in here later.
I let my chickens in my beds last fall...I did not like how much digging they did.

I leave all my plant roots in the ground until next spring. And cover my beds with the seasons last leaf gatherings.
In spring I might take bigger old root balls out and ad them to compost, but usually clip off at soil surface old plants and vines and add that to shredder then to compost piles.

My soil fertility gurus tell me to leave roots in ground as long as I can, eventually microbes and bacterias will eat this and exude something wonderfull from the consumption of the roots.

I feel guilty burning food AKA plant debris.
Something in nature cycle will eat it.

Maybe a ten year burn cycle or something?
Add different nutrients, kill a few forb seeds?
I dunno I'm learning.
Good to see you safely back on your homestead.
 

Astral-Pepe

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I'll give this thread a bump because it's that time of the year.

I doubled my garden space this year. I have about 70 tomato plants in there plus corn, kale, carrots, Swiss chard and spinach. I also have two more greenhouses and I'm growing peppers, tomatoes, kale, spinach, Swiss chard, lettuce, herbs, and some other things in those.

The pumpkins and squash were all a failure last year so I didn't plant any this year. Likewise I'm only doing the lettuce and spinach in the greenhouses because they didn't do well in the garden last year.

Everything is green and lush right now and I can finally take a break and go swimming today.

I'll post some pics later.
 

anti-barabas-ite

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I'll give this thread a bump because it's that time of the year.

I doubled my garden space this year. I have about 70 tomato plants in there plus corn, kale, carrots, Swiss chard and spinach. I also have two more greenhouses and I'm growing peppers, tomatoes, kale, spinach, Swiss chard, lettuce, herbs, and some other things in those.

The pumpkins and squash were all a failure last year so I didn't plant any this year. Likewise I'm only doing the lettuce and spinach in the greenhouses because they didn't do well in the garden last year.

Everything is green and lush right now and I can finally take a break and go swimming today.

I'll post some pics later.
Tell me about the new greenhouses when you come back.

What growing zone
 

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I tried burying some frozen shad (whole fish about 6in to 3in) fishing bait under half of my tomatoes to see if there would be any difference. Planted in my well composted raised beds on my seized land between my neighbor's and my driveway. I will report my findings. As of right now the un-fished plants are bigger and fuller but the fish plants have many flowers starting.

Agrarian gamers rise up!
 

Astral-Pepe

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Tell me about the new greenhouses when you come back.
They are ShelterLogic greenhouses. They come in a kit that you put together. I got a bigger one last year on sale at my local hardware store, it's 10'x10' and then I ordered two 6'x8' ones from their website a while ago.


They're not really easy to put together but it did them all by myself without too much trouble.

It's so hot inside them already that I have to open the zippered windows to let the heat out during the day.

The smaller ones I have kiddie pools in with things in pots:






The bigger one I'm reorganizing right now and moving hay bales in around the inside perimeter to moderate the temperature and extend my growing season. I don't know how much difference that will make but we'll see.








 

anti-barabas-ite

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Yeah, 5g is messing up your health..
 

Saint Bridget

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They are ShelterLogic greenhouses. They come in a kit that you put together. I got a bigger one last year on sale at my local hardware store, it's 10'x10' and then I ordered two 6'x8' ones from their website a while ago.


They're not really easy to put together but it did them all by myself without too much trouble.

It's so hot inside them already that I have to open the zippered windows to let the heat out during the day.

The smaller ones I have kiddie pools in with things in pots:






The bigger one I'm reorganizing right now and moving hay bales in around the inside perimeter to moderate the temperature and extend my growing season. I don't know how much difference that will make but we'll see.








Duuude! That’s awesome! I’m impressed, very cool greenhouses :)
Im gonna update tomorrow with pics. My husbands mother passed away and we were her home aides all winter while she was on hospices care. So I haven’t been able to spend time online really. But I love this thread and am psyched to see how and what everyone is growing :)

anyone growing anything exotic or interesting? New techniques?
 

Astral-Pepe

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Duuude! That’s awesome! I’m impressed, very cool greenhouses
Thanks, they look way better right now. Much more organized and more things in pots. I'm harvesting more lettuce and spinach than I can possibly eat and the kale and Swiss chard will be doing the same thing to me very soon.

anyone growing anything exotic or interesting?
I've got a bunch of different peppers this year. Scotch bonnets, habaneros, ghost peppers and some other ones I forget. I have them in big pots in my main greenhouse because the peppers did very poorly in the garden last year. So far they look really good and healthy.

I also have lemongrass, which, if you've never had it, is one of the things that makes Thai curry so hecking delicious. It looks a bit like green onions but tastes like lemon. Last year I grew it in the garden and it did ok but this year I'm doing all the herbs in the greenhouse just for no other reason than my autistic nature.

I'm doing some squash in pots in the greenhouse as well because the squash and pumpkins didn't do well in the garden last year. I'm hoping I can keep a better eye on them and prevent the bugs from eating them like they did last year.

It hasn't rained here in like two weeks so I'm very lucky that I'm on a well and I can keep everything heavily watered for just the cost of running my pump.

Like I said I have about 70 tomato plants and I'm going to make tomato sauce to store in glass jars for the rest of the year.

I'm going to basically follow Grama Gina's procedure on that:


I did a bit of that last year, one big pot of it and I hit it all with the stick blender instead of peeling all those tomatoes. That worked really well.
 

Bigjohn

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I've been having a lot of fun with onions. They're cheap, hardy, delicious, nutritious and incredibly easy to grow. Just plant a ton (you can buy 100 seed bulbs for like $5) in a patch of half decent dirt early in the spring. Red, yellow, white,, doesn't matter. You don't really need to water them, they hold their own against weeds, and you don't need a fence or anything around them because pests like deer leave them alone.

When they start coming up gradually thin them out by eating the green onions (which are the best) then harvest them in the summer or fall when they are large (or whatever size you want) and keep them in a cool dry place and they last for a couple months. If you neglect them or forget about them in the fall they over winter fine in the ground and are one of the first green things to come back early in the spring.

Most people don't know the green part of the onion is the best most flavorful part. If you buy onions at the store they always chop the top off because it wilts and doesn't ship well. But good fresh onion greens are amazing for cooking or eating raw. The green part can get a little woody when they get large (then just eat the white part like a normie) but when they are small (<12") or even medium sized (~18") the green part is the best. You can even pick the greens, leave the bulb and it will grow back new greens (after about the third pick they start to get bitter).

I would highly recommend any beginners to gardening start with onions. They are very inexpensive, very easy, very versatile for cooking, very good for you, and they store for a long time also.
 
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anti-barabas-ite

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Fun discussion of light technology in relation to plants genetic expression.

Plants turn on or off certain genomics or epigenetics depending on the frequency of light it recieves.

The globohomoschlomo is building infrastructure to sell you food grown indoors because, soils are fooked, sun is unreliable?
And they can't control it.

And soon 12 billion eaters.

Recall your human cells all have circadian clocks that also respond to frequencies of light. As you stay indoors under artificial light your biomechanics change and adapt. Sometimes to the detriment of what our creator intended.

Light water magnetism...use wisely
 

Bigjohn

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They are ShelterLogic greenhouses. They come in a kit that you put together. I got a bigger one last year on sale at my local hardware store, it's 10'x10' and then I ordered two 6'x8' ones from their website a while ago.


They're not really easy to put together but it did them all by myself without too much trouble.

It's so hot inside them already that I have to open the zippered windows to let the heat out during the day.

The smaller ones I have kiddie pools in with things in pots:






The bigger one I'm reorganizing right now and moving hay bales in around the inside perimeter to moderate the temperature and extend my growing season. I don't know how much difference that will make but we'll see.








What's the thought process with the dirt in glass jars?
 

Astral-Pepe

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What's the thought process with the dirt in glass jars?
Yeah, good question. That's basil and oregano growing in them. When it was still cold outside I started seeds in those jars and used smaller jars (the ones that are in the shelf down below) fitted into the tops of the bigger jars like a mini greenhouse. I should get a picture of how I did that but it worked ok as an experiment. I have all those jars together in trays now and the herbs are getting really big.

The drawback is you don't get any drainage so you have to water carefully with a plant sprayer.

Like I said, it was an experiment and we'll see how it does.
 

Bigjohn

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Yeah, good question. That's basil and oregano growing in them. When it was still cold outside I started seeds in those jars and used smaller jars (the ones that are in the shelf down below) fitted into the tops of the bigger jars like a mini greenhouse. I should get a picture of how I did that but it worked ok as an experiment. I have all those jars together in trays now and the herbs are getting really big.

The drawback is you don't get any drainage so you have to water carefully with a plant sprayer.

Like I said, it was an experiment and we'll see how it does.
Have you ever seen static hydroponics? You can plant seeds in something like Rockwool and suspend it in a net cup in a Mason jar of nutrient solution. No moving parts, just a jar of water (with nutrients in it). The roots grow down into the water in the jar and drink up the solution. I did it for leafy greens for a long time and it worked great. I upgraded to a NFT system because I eventually had too many jars and it was kind of a hassle to monitor all the water levels. It looks like a static hydroponic system would fit well with your space and the types of plants you are growing.
 

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Who's got strong arguments for natural, home made toothpaste?
 
Just started raising some chicks. Got a variety of breeds but they are all egg layers. You can order chicks online, which may be easier this time of year than going to a store, but it doesn't hurt to shop local for supplies. Check out: https://www.meyerhatchery.com/Chickens-c39349237 to order some chicks. Be warned, they do not always make the journey, expect to find a couple of dead chicks. Here's another thing to keep in mind, chicks die easy! Sometimes it isn't even your fault they just die. With that said, please educate yourself on Youtube or wherever before getting chicks. This aspect may be intimidating, but don't worry! You can do it! Chicks don't require monitoring throughout the day. Just check on them in the morning and evening, or midday if you have the opportunity. I check on my birds 3 times a day. As long as their environment is clean, they have food, water, and appropriate warmth, you don't really have to do much. If you live in an urban environment, I suggest getting egg layers. While I would love to get chickens for harvesting meat, it would only be worth it to me if I got 50 of them, and I don't have the space for that until I can afford to buy some land. I don't recommend buying 5 chickens for meat, because you have to pay for the costs associated with raising them, and then what? You only have 5 birds. Another thing with raising chicks is that you need to clean their butts sometimes. They get something called "pasty butt", and if you don't wipe their butts they can get clogged up and die. Another thing I recommend researching beforehand is how to revive a chick. When chicks get weak and aren't moving much, they are in danger of dying and need to be nursed back to health quickly. Know how to save them before this happens to your chicks, as time is of the essence. Lastly, raising chicks is a fun experience, and if you are able to raise chicks, definitely do it! It is a wholesome experience that you won't get from binging Netflix or playing video games. It also is not difficult to do.

How to:

Choosing a breed:
 
Who's got strong arguments for natural, home made toothpaste?
I would wager most disease is caused by how many chemicals we surround ourselves with. We surround ourselves with so many chemicals we don't even think about it. There's chemicals in our food, our water, our swimming pools, medicine, shampoo, and even our toothpaste. Next time you are sick, don't assume it is a virus. Just ask yourself what you've done recently that might've gotten you sick. Did you drink excessively? Did you neglect your sleep? Or maybe you slept too much? Did you stop working out? Did you eat a lot of fast food? etc. Listen to your body! We are told that medicine in history was just a bunch of whacky guess work and "snake oils" that cured nothing. However, going by older texts regarding wellness, I have found wisdom that I have never seen displayed by modern doctors. I would even wager that modern medicine is just the legacy of "snake oils" we have seen throughout history. As no respectable practitioner of medicine I have seen in history worried about vaccines, or chemicals to save patients. It was usually advice like "don't be a coomer or a glutton". Also keep in mind they weren't pumping their bodies with chemicals 24/7.

On a side note, if you have any natural, or home made toothpaste recipes, I would love to know!
 

anti-barabas-ite

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, if you have any natural, or home made toothpaste recipes, I would love to know!
Baking soda.

I use hydrogen peroxide to clean my teeth.

Joe mercola had a dr on podcast last week discussing g dental abscesses and the terrible toll they have on the whole body.

Preddy interesting discussion.

I think this same dr recommended nebulizer hydrogen peroxide for pre covid prophylactic
 
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