Gardening/Homesteading/Farming/Permaculture

My interests in these topics:


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wumao

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Could be right, about 1.5 acres for beef cows and depends on how you manage your pasture and the amount of forage on it.
Milk cows do different protien profiles iirc.
The quality of forage and hay is going to determine milk production.
Depending on the temp in winter and how much my cows eat a day is a gauge.
If too much is shit on and laid on one day I cut back. And depending on bale size, i can feed a dense packed alfalfa bale less a day than a light weight grass only bale. I feed mine everyday in new spot to spread manure and watch consumption.
There is a death triangle on a cow , if you are behind the cow, its left side just in front of hip bones up towards spine, if that triangle is sunk in and visible, it most likely means that cow aint full, I think it's part of a chamber of stomachs or rumen , I forget which. I watch that too to make sure I'm feeding enough. Depends on where you are hay can be very expensive.

Cows are also herd animals, the reason I dont have 1, is they need other cows to be happy, I want no cortisol and happy meat.
I'll probably have to have a beef cow also. The milk cow has to be pregnant every year. Enough land to grow hay would be nice. I'm looking for 20+ acres farm plus some woods.
 

Seamus McHermit

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From what I've been told, your want at least five acres for a grass fed milk cow. And then one bail of hay per day in the winter.
The answer to that is β€œit depends.” I’d say that’s a decent starting point, but you could go way smaller with the right conditions. With good rotational pasture management and a decent climate, 1 acre per cow is easily manageable in somewhere that gets 30+ inches of rain per year.

But yeah, the influencing factors are going to be rainfall, summer temperatures, winter temperatures, quality of forage and hay, and size and breed of cow. A 600lb mini Jersey is going to eat half of what a 1200lb Holstein eats.

Honestly unless you have a use for huge quantities of milk, 1-2 gallons per day, per cow (butter, cheese, yogurt, selling it off), the ideal dairy animals for most homesteaders are going to be 2 to 4 goats. Much less picky when it comes to forage, more reliable milk supply to have multiple animals than one, and much easier on infrastructure and pastures to have multiple small animals than one or two large ones.
 

wumao

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The answer to that is β€œit depends.” I’d say that’s a decent starting point, but you could go way smaller with the right conditions. With good rotational pasture management and a decent climate, 1 acre per cow is easily manageable in somewhere that gets 30+ inches of rain per year.

But yeah, the influencing factors are going to be rainfall, summer temperatures, winter temperatures, quality of forage and hay, and size and breed of cow. A 600lb mini Jersey is going to eat half of what a 1200lb Holstein eats.

Honestly unless you have a use for huge quantities of milk, 1-2 gallons per day, per cow (butter, cheese, yogurt, selling it off), the ideal dairy animals for most homesteaders are going to be 2 to 4 goats. Much less picky when it comes to forage, more reliable milk supply to have multiple animals than one, and much easier on infrastructure and pastures to have multiple small animals than one or two large ones.
I've never had goat's milk so I don't know if I'd like it. I'm willing to struggle through the Apocalypse if I can drink delicious milk and eat steak now and then. I'm not eating bug patties. I'll kill to defend the cow!
 

Saint Bridget

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Does anyone here recognize what kind of squash or melon this could be? It’s a mystery compost surprise and I’d like to harvest them and cook them, and know what they are would make that much easier. I’ve put them thru some identification apps, but am getting vague summer/winter squash results no specifics. 96CDECC6-0E66-4A73-9602-7CABBFB29696.jpeg
 

Seamus McHermit

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Does anyone here recognize what kind of squash or melon this could be? It’s a mystery compost surprise and I’d like to harvest them and cook them, and know what they are would make that much easier. I’ve put them thru some identification apps, but am getting vague summer/winter squash results no specifics. View attachment 20708
Looks like a delicata squash to me
 

Donk

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Escaped True Master
The police know they are useless until after...so plant invasion raspberry bushes!

Great prepper advice!
I don't see people mention berries very often, but they're really great to grow. A cluster of the right blueberry bushes will produce a plethora of fat sweet n' sour blueberries every year with very little to no maintenance. Raspberries are always a winner and some varieties will produce all summer and fall until the very last rays of Autumn warmth fade. Strawberries? I don't even touch store-bought, because they can't compare to fresh. Clip off strawberry plant "runners" and the plants will produce lots of fruit.

Also, strawberries are one of the most heavily pesticide-soaked storebought plant foods you can find, another reason I indulge in only home-grown.

Berries are also really great for freezing or canning as preserves, of course.


The other slam-dunk are 'taters. They are so damn easy to grow and never seem to let me down.
 

Donk

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Escaped True Master
I dont do it for the money savings. I do it to reconnect to my agrarian roots, to the get satisfaction of knowing that I can create food from seed, and also the taste of a homegrown tomato is so good that I refuse to buy them from the grocery in the off season. I have become a home-grown organic snob lol.
Yes, agreed home-grown tastes better. My home-grown 'taters are so much different and better than even the organic high-dollar store ones. The home-growns are very dense, flavorful, and with a great meaty-thick but tender texture when cooked. All it takes is one small one added to a meal, and it's like getting an incredible long-lasting energy and nutrient bomb. I don't even do anything but literally just let the 'taters grow in the nice soil.

Similarly, home-made chicken eggs are often somuch better than store-bought, with dark orange yolks. You can just tell you're getting so much more from the food, with the chickens eating bugs and mice everything.

I know someone with a garden, and surrounding the garden is a fenced-in "moat" chicken racetrack. The chickens patrol all around the garden and eat any pest that tries to get at the garden.

Another of my favorites that just RIPS every year are the sugar snap peas.
 
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Sardinian_Guy

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I think I will not have too much "starvation" problem because close relatives have dairy farms, being in a productive agricoltural zones with low population density
The old man buy pork an chicken and seasonal fruits only made in Sardinia and even exotic fruits with very few intermediary no mention the freezer there is always some frozen beef
Relatives can easily produce a lot of vegetables because they not need to prepare the soil or irrigation or fertilize because the use a little part of culivated land is already prepared for maize and hay for the dairy cow feed and there is irrigation system already
 

GreenManalishi

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Dont forget your defensive plants for your perimeter that you cannot always defend. Prickly pear cactus, yucca, and thorn bushes that also grow blackberries are a must. There are a few other species: japonica, hawthorn, and holly bushes also come to mind.

Also these:
Blackberrys and Meyer Lemons. Lots of bad thorns and lots of wonderful produce.
 

GreenManalishi

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Working the soil in your bare feet with dog wandering around birds squealing wind blowing sweat in your eyes and a chance the holy spirit may lift you up and talk to you...priceless!

People invariably ask is it worth all that effort when you can get it all at wallmart in 5 minutes...

Of course it is, and what if wallmarts power goes out!?
And Walmart, aka WakandaMart, is infested with niggers. Grow our own!!!
 

nobodi

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The other day, everything on the plate was from the backyard, except for the meat.
Carrots are rocking it, so is the broccoli, snow peas are like chips, heaps of lettuces, nice tomatoes.
Bitch gon dun good.

Spring just turned up, it will get wild in the next few weeks, so will the weeds, and the grass.
 

Seamus McHermit

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The other day, everything on the plate was from the backyard, except for the meat.
Carrots are rocking it, so is the broccoli, snow peas are like chips, heaps of lettuces, nice tomatoes.
Bitch gon dun good.

Spring just turned up, it will get wild in the next few weeks, so will the weeds, and the grass.
Ya fookin down unda, mate?
 

MaxTriggers

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Well, it looks like I'm an outlier here in the desert southwest.

There's something to be said for wide open spaces and open views for as far as the eye can see.

Some advantages to homesteading in the DSW...

1. Cheap property available, many of which can be bought on owner carry terms.

2. 300 plus days of sunshine a year.

3. Minimal weeds and NO MOWING NECESSARY. God I hate mowing... and shoveling snow for that matter lol

4. Super low humidity and very few bugs.

5. Tons of property within a 30-45 minute drive from urban area's like Las Vegas, Phoenix, St. George, Tucson, and the Inland Empire. This doesn't even touch Texas, NM, or Colorado.

6. Few building restrictions and not a lot of nosy people crawling up your ass.


I picked up a 5 acre piece with a well and cabin shell for about $500 a month. My goal is to drop in a 20kw diesel generator for unlimited off the grid power and a solar array for day to day power.

Water is plentiful although the well is about 300 ft. deep. We are planting trees, shrubs, and several misting systems to cool down the desert heat.

The greenhouse will be geothermal as the average temp at 8' deep is around 65 degrees and can keep the greenhouse cool even when it's 115 out.

These are a couple of video's I have paid close attention to, and I even bought plans for the greenhouse that this old boy designed... he grows oranges year round in Nebraska.



.
 

Seamus McHermit

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Well, it looks like I'm an outlier here in the desert southwest.

There's something to be said for wide open spaces and open views for as far as the eye can see.

Some advantages to homesteading in the DSW...

1. Cheap property available, many of which can be bought on owner carry terms.

2. 300 plus days of sunshine a year.

3. Minimal weeds and NO MOWING NECESSARY. God I hate mowing... and shoveling snow for that matter lol

4. Super low humidity and very few bugs.

5. Tons of property within a 30-45 minute drive from urban area's like Las Vegas, Phoenix, St. George, Tucson, and the Inland Empire. This doesn't even touch Texas, NM, or Colorado.

6. Few building restrictions and not a lot of nosy people crawling up your ass.


I picked up a 5 acre piece with a well and cabin shell for about $500 a month. My goal is to drop in a 20kw diesel generator for unlimited off the grid power and a solar array for day to day power.

Water is plentiful although the well is about 300 ft. deep. We are planting trees, shrubs, and several misting systems to cool down the desert heat.

The greenhouse will be geothermal as the average temp at 8' deep is around 65 degrees and can keep the greenhouse cool even when it's 115 out.

These are a couple of video's I have paid close attention to, and I even bought plans for the greenhouse that this old boy designed... he grows oranges year round in Nebraska.



.
Water storage, water storage, water storage! With smart water storage and landscape features like swales and basins to capture runoff in the rare event that it does rain, and some tough shade trees, you can easily turn a desert into an oasis.

If you haven’t already, check out Geoff Lawton’s greening the desert project, where he created a food forest in the middle of one of the saltiest, driest, worst deserts on earth (Jordan.)
 

Lassitor

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I have seriously looked in to Homesteading and Earthships and concluded that at this time it is all unworkable.
  • Government Regulations: City/County/State regulations make it difficult if not unworkable to live in a subsistence manor. They can limit how many chickens you have, and to what you can grow on your own land!
  • Taxes: Any government that can tax your property can raise them to a point where you cannot stay.
  • Land use: Government can simply decide to change what you can do with your lands at a whim, what you can build, and how you can build it.
  • Government land grab: They can simply declare your land a nuisance or decide to build a high density homes there, and take your land with out your consent. If someone wanders on your lands who they decide is a wanton felon, they can seize your lands because you are aiding and abetting.
  • No private or exclusive use: The government can come to your property at any time, for any reason, and lay any charge at you for anything; even taking you away and unable to tend to your property.
Property Rights and the Constitution
America’s Founders understood clearly that private property is the foundation not only of prosperity but of freedom itself. Thus, through the common law, state law, and the Constitution, they protected property rights β€” the rights of people to acquire, use, and dispose of property freely. With the growth of modern government, however, those rights have been seriously compromised. Unfortunately, the Supreme Court has yet to develop a principled, much less comprehensive, theory for remedying those violations. That failure has led to the birth of the property rights movement in state after state. It is time now for Congress to step in β€” to correct the federal government’s own violations and to set out a standard that courts might notice as they adjudicate complaints about state violations.
The only people that I can find that have any sovereign rights when it comes to landownership is the Native Americans and Alaska Natives. Even then, they have to work with their tribes that are mostly communist in nature, and highly corrupted, as to land rights and possession.

Elsewhere, whites have not been treated well when it comes to landownership and use. Just look at the Whites in Africa to see how it went.

You would need Constitutionally Protected land rights, that is very clearly stated, and where there is significant consequences when City/County/State powers overstep and violate your rights.

Currently however ~ YOU ARE A SLAVE
  1. A slave lives in fear of its master at all times
  2. The master can give or take from the slave at anytime, for any reason, with or without notice
  3. A slave only cares for the possessions of the master,
  4. Those things possessed by the slave are in truth the possessions of the master, who simply lets the slave manage those things for the profits of the master.
  5. The slave is interchangeable, the master lets the slave know this at all times
  6. The slave has no real rights, and the master reminds the slave at all times about this.
  7. What rights the slave thinks they have is only at the connivance of the master provided it makes a compliant slave.
  8. Slaves that misbehave are quickly and divisively dealt with, in a harsh and brutal manor. Public executions are needed to remind the slaves as to what happens. Remember Waco, Ruby Ridge, and many other slaves who where summery executed for not behaving.
To have REAL FREEDOM, unalienable rights, where you can live as freemen, where you control your own destiny, means to take lands that you can thrive on and defend them from those who will enslave you, or deny you of your unalienable rights

The Freeman Movement
These are people who try and use Lawfare (legalese) to obtain the rights that they desire. They all fail, and are often brutally executed on their own lands for trying, or are arrested and thrown in a dark hole on made-up charges, because it is not convent to the masters that such people are bucking their system.

sovereign citizen
This is a person who only answers to Common Law and is not subjected to government polices.
In my own research there is only one class of person who is a sovereign citizen, and that is the Police who protect the Masters. All others who are NOT Police and who do not behave according to the subjugation of government polices are to be hunted down and executed by the True Sovereign Citizens ~ The police.

The Masters of this world are the multi-billion dollar corporations that can simply buy its way, and its will, anywhere and with anyone. Those who control the corporations, a very small core of elites, do not have your freedom in mind, nor care anything for you. To them, if you are not their slave, then you are a rival, and they destroy rivals.
 

MaxTriggers

I'm Dreaming Of A White Christmas
Old World Underground
β°β˜•
I have seriously looked in to Homesteading and Earthships and concluded that at this time it is all unworkable.
  • Government Regulations: City/County/State regulations make it difficult if not unworkable to live in a subsistence manor. They can limit how many chickens you have, and to what you can grow on your own land!
  • Taxes: Any government that can tax your property can raise them to a point where you cannot stay.
  • Land use: Government can simply decide to change what you can do with your lands at a whim, what you can build, and how you can build it.
  • Government land grab: They can simply declare your land a nuisance or decide to build a high density homes there, and take your land with out your consent. If someone wanders on your lands who they decide is a wanton felon, they can seize your lands because you are aiding and abetting.
  • No private or exclusive use: The government can come to your property at any time, for any reason, and lay any charge at you for anything; even taking you away and unable to tend to your property.
Property Rights and the Constitution

The only people that I can find that have any sovereign rights when it comes to landownership is the Native Americans and Alaska Natives. Even then, they have to work with their tribes that are mostly communist in nature, and highly corrupted, as to land rights and possession.

Elsewhere, whites have not been treated well when it comes to landownership and use. Just look at the Whites in Africa to see how it went.

You would need Constitutionally Protected land rights, that is very clearly stated, and where there is significant consequences when City/County/State powers overstep and violate your rights.

Currently however ~ YOU ARE A SLAVE
  1. A slave lives in fear of its master at all times
  2. The master can give or take from the slave at anytime, for any reason, with or without notice
  3. A slave only cares for the possessions of the master,
  4. Those things possessed by the slave are in truth the possessions of the master, who simply lets the slave manage those things for the profits of the master.
  5. The slave is interchangeable, the master lets the slave know this at all times
  6. The slave has no real rights, and the master reminds the slave at all times about this.
  7. What rights the slave thinks they have is only at the connivance of the master provided it makes a compliant slave.
  8. Slaves that misbehave are quickly and divisively dealt with, in a harsh and brutal manor. Public executions are needed to remind the slaves as to what happens. Remember Waco, Ruby Ridge, and many other slaves who where summery executed for not behaving.
To have REAL FREEDOM, unalienable rights, where you can live as freemen, where you control your own destiny, means to take lands that you can thrive on and defend them from those who will enslave you, or deny you of your unalienable rights

The Freeman Movement
These are people who try and use Lawfare (legalese) to obtain the rights that they desire. They all fail, and are often brutally executed on their own lands for trying, or are arrested and thrown in a dark hole on made-up charges, because it is not convent to the masters that such people are bucking their system.

sovereign citizen
This is a person who only answers to Common Law and is not subjected to government polices.
In my own research there is only one class of person who is a sovereign citizen, and that is the Police who protect the Masters. All others who are NOT Police and who do not behave according to the subjugation of government polices are to be hunted down and executed by the True Sovereign Citizens ~ The police.

The Masters of this world are the multi-billion dollar corporations that can simply buy its way, and its will, anywhere and with anyone. Those who control the corporations, a very small core of elites, do not have your freedom in mind, nor care anything for you. To them, if you are not their slave, then you are a rival, and they destroy rivals.


.
Damn... and I was in such a good mood this morning before you dumped a fat cyber-shit on my sunny day lol

What do you recommend?

Because after reading your post I'm thinking this might be the only option...

1598888196600.png
 

Lassitor

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Old World Underground
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β°β˜•πŸš¬πŸš½
Well, it looks like I'm an outlier here in the desert southwest.

There's something to be said for wide open spaces and open views for as far as the eye can see.

Some advantages to homesteading in the DSW...

1. Cheap property available, many of which can be bought on owner carry terms.

2. 300 plus days of sunshine a year.

3. Minimal weeds and NO MOWING NECESSARY. God I hate mowing... and shoveling snow for that matter lol

4. Super low humidity and very few bugs.

5. Tons of property within a 30-45 minute drive from urban area's like Las Vegas, Phoenix, St. George, Tucson, and the Inland Empire. This doesn't even touch Texas, NM, or Colorado.

6. Few building restrictions and not a lot of nosy people crawling up your ass.
I live here in Nevada, Las Vegas to be exact. I know people who have acres out in the desert.

  1. Cheap land but difficult to do anything with it. Heat, low humidity and desert soil just does not grow much of anything.
  2. Water is always an issue. Most have to import it from somewhere else. Wells and natural springs are not common, and if so, then the land will be very costly to procure.
  3. The county will tell you what types of buildings you can have on your land and how many. They may require you to meet thier codes and policies, and if you don't or can't - they will condemn your land.
The people I know who live on desert lands, have to have income from outside sources to live on the land.

The only brothels and casinos can make it as a desert land business, that has proven to be a true fact here in Nevada.

I would open up a brothel here in Nevada, but the millennials don't seem t like sex so I am not sure if there be any business.
 

Lassitor

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.
Damn... and I was in such a good mood this morning before you dumped a fat cyber-shit on my sunny day lol

What do you recommend?

Because after reading your post I'm thinking this might be the only option...
Historically and traditionally, land is taken and declared liberated from the previous occupants. This has been going on for thousands of years, and will continue to go on for thousands of years.

Of course you have to defend your land from rivals, and there are always rivals.

Lands are always taken by force. You have to have superior force to take the land, or make it costly to your rivals to defend the lands they hold, or retaking the lands you claim.

What I recomend at this time is to spot your rivals weaknesses and prepare for land occupation.
 

MichaelWittmann

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Fig trees are great. I live on a house with a small lot, and when doing some landscaping in the front put in two fig trees, and another two on the side of the house. That was about six years ago.

The ones on the side of the house are now taller than the house itself, and the ones in front are almost as big, despite having been killed to the ground by a week-long freeze a few years ago. I get 1 1/2 to 2 pounds of fresh figs a day from late summer to fall. They're great fresh, or you can put them in bread or make preserves out of them. They also can be dried or frozen.

Bugs don't eat them, so you don't need pesticides. The only things that eat them are the birds, but I like to watch them anyway so I don't mind.
 
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