China: Feminists Whine Over “Sexualized” College Ads

Andrew Anglin

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“Let me be part of your youth”

China needs to be careful. When I say that, I mean: they need to be very, very careful.

If feminism is allowed to creep in, it will rot the entire country from the inside.

I know that some of this stuff seems harmless, and it is easy to say “oh well, no need to upset women.” But here’s the thing: they are not really upset. They use pretending to be upset as a way to grab power.

I’ve been monitoring the situation in China, and am seeing more and more capitulation to women who are pretending to be upset.

Here’s the latest case.

SCMP:

One of the top universities in China is under fire for using women to lure applicants in a sexually suggestive online advertisement, with critics saying the college is objectifying women.

Nanjing University (NJU) posted the advertisement on Weibo on Monday, the first day of the gaokao exams, China’s national college entrance tests.

The advertisement featured six photos of current students holding up signs in front of different parts of the campus.

Two of the photos attracted the most criticism. One included a pretty woman holding up a sign that read, “Do you want to live at the library with me, from morning till night?” and the other said, “Do you want me to become part of your youth?”

“Do you want to live at the library with me, from morning till night?”
The other photos, especially when men held up the signs, did not feature the seemingly suggestive text. For example, one man was pictured holding a sign that said, “Do you want to become an honest, diligent and ambitious NJU student?”

The ads became controversial online almost immediately.

“The problem with this photo is that it treats women as if they should be someone’s belonging. These women made it to NJU, but now they are ‘part of someone else’s youth’? That is ridiculous,” one comment said on Weibo.


Another wrote: “As a top university, you should recruit based on your resources and quality of your academics, instead of using hot guys and pretty women to lure people.”

NJU deleted the ads after they were bombarded online. The school did not respond to the South China Morning Post’s request for comment.

Some people, however, questioned whether the criticism was an overreaction, saying the advertisement did not need to result in a deep conversation about gender equality.

One commenter said: “There is no need to be all serious in the ads, they can surely write this way to attract young people. No need to be picky,” one said.

Chengyusan, an NGO that fights gender-based violence, wrote: “In our culture, people are acquiescent about objectifying women, and even if these women express discomfort and anger, they are often labelled as ‘overreacting’. We refuse adverts that do not respect women’s independence or regard women’s equal rights as a joke.”
Why are NGOs with subversive agendas even allowed to operate in China?

Well, for one thing, China is a more free country than America, so they don’t necessarily crack down on organizations that are more or less fundamentally opposed to the core values of the nation in the way that the US government cracks down on organizations that say things like “white people don’t deserve to die.”

But the other thing is that China, in its innocence, doesn’t suspect these agendas. If the NGO says “we’re against beating up women,” they take that at face value. However, Chengyusan has exposed itself here, yet again, in commenting on these ads: what do the ads have to do with “violence”? Clearly, nothing – but to women, “violence” is anything they don’t like. They will always make the claim that “speech is violence.”

The South China Morning Post, is a subversive feminist Hong Kong newspaper. This article is written by one Phobe Zhang, who is fat, has been pumping out these anti-male propaganda articles.



(Seriously – go look at his catalog of articles. She also promotes gay stuff.)

She used the opportunity of this university ad “controversy” to bring up something that really bothered the sluts last month.

Last month, NetEase Games apologised after a human resources staff said they would drug female workers in a recruitment ad.

In the ad, the staff posted a photo of the entire team on WeChat moments and said, “Recruiting. If you like any of my female coworkers, I’ll try and get a date”.

Then in the comments, the staff member wrote, “Give me a resume, I can even help drug them”.

After the ad sparked concerns online, the human resources department of NetEase Games said in a notice that they had fired the staff member and apologised for such inappropriate behaviour.
That was really funny. And that’s obviously what it was – a joke. It’s an edgy joke, and I could see people taking issue with the promotion of a “causal sex” workplace, but firing the guy after complaints of “sexism” is the exact sort of thing that would happen in America. Agreeing to fire someone because of women’s feelings is a huge win for women, and they will use that to gain more power.

Women having power is always a net negative for society. The more power women have, the weaker society is, because they will only ever use that power to destroy.

The key issue is this: the better off society gets materially, the more aggressive women will get in their power grabs.

The Chinese must learn these obvious facts, or their civilization will go the way of the West.



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Aquafina

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Just get those soldier guys to put them up against the wall and bingo ;)
 

DaveA

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In all times and all places, women are as feminist as they're allowed to be. When men are strong and united enough to shut that shit down, women become contented housewives and mothers. When men are weak, women start behaving even more outrageously in hopes that some band of strong men will put them in their place, even if that means opening the city gates to the barbarians.
 

Simp Patrol

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The key issue is this: the better off society gets materially, the more aggressive women will get in their power grabs.
I'm interested seeing how China is going to keep their women in check now that they are rich. Poverty naturally helps keep sluts in check. China is an atheist country, right? I just don't see how you can long-term run a rich country without a right-hand religion. Are there any historical examples?
 

Angryguy

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I'm interested seeing how China is going to keep their women in check now that they are rich. Poverty naturally helps keep sluts in check. China is an atheist country, right? I just don't see how you can long-term run a rich country without a right-hand religion. Are there any historical examples?
I would argue China was more feminist under Mao than now. But you are right the rot has come in from the west. Materialism is more dangerous than communism and the type of feminism it brings in is more destructive. Communism promoted second wave variety feminism. Right now third and fourth wave feminism is trying to take over. Along with homosexualism.
There are gay parades in China and there is a trend called boy love movies taking over. If Xi doesn't stop this soon we are going to have no sane society in the world. North Korea and Iran will be the hold outs.
 

JR_Rustler_III

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China is an atheist country, right? I just don't see how you can long-term run a rich country without a right-hand religion. Are there any historical examples?
China at least has Confucianism to fall back on, which--despite being atheist--has a fairly rigorous moral and ethical code. Of course, a half-century of Communism undermined China's Confucianist value system, but Xi is bringing it back. Whether he is doing that in a calculated fashion to rebuild traditional Chinese values as a bulwark against western degeneracy, or is simply paying it lip service in order to re-establish a connection to China's historical identity as an Imperial power and regional hegemon, is not 100% clear.

South Korea is probably the only country on earth that matters which has continuously maintained an explicitly Confucianist value system for thousands of years. That, combined with the fact that they are ~30% Christian, has made them highly resistant to moral and cultural subversion even though they have been laboring under the yoke of Deepstate/ZOG since Park Chung-Hee was assassinated in 1979.
 

Oystein

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I'm interested seeing how China is going to keep their women in check now that they are rich. Poverty naturally helps keep sluts in check. China is an atheist country, right? I just don't see how you can long-term run a rich country without a right-hand religion. Are there any historical examples?
Confucianism has been the dominant philosophy since the early Han dynasty. Confucianism is basically about how social duties and how subjects and rulers should interact. The family is considered the base unit of society, with the oldest male leading the family. There are special rules for women called the Three Obediencies. First, an unmarried woman must obey her father. Second, a married woman must obey her husband. Third, a widow must obey her sons (with the eldest being most important, since he's the new head of the family). At the same time a man must honor his mother.

Filial piety is considered extremely important. You are supposed to honor your parents and take care of them. Every year there is the Qingming Festival during which you are supposed to go to your ancestral shrine and honor your ancestors. You must have children (and at least one son to carry on the family name) so that they can take perform those duties for your ancestors and yourself once you have died. Having a son was historically considered so important that it was common for childless men to adopt a nephew if a brother had a "spare" son.

I don't know how rigourously normal Chinese people are following this today, but there is a working template in Confucianism.
 

JR_Rustler_III

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I don't know how rigourously normal Chinese people are following this today, but there is a working template in Confucianism.
Three thousand years of culture and history is very hard to subvert, especially when there aren't Jews around to help that subversion along. My guess is, almost a century under Communism and related revolutionary ideologies (everyone forgets that the Kuomintang was also a revolutionary party, just a much less successful one) put some big dents into China's Confucianist legacy, but the damage is fixable.
 

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It's so sad watching the Chinese slowly fold to feminism and (((Western))) manipulation. They don't understand that they need to do something truly drastic to save their country, North Korean style, before it's too late.
Yeah it's sad. I wish I could bitchslap Xi and Putin "yo, you are totally tapped out, you need to start reading Tranny Watch RIGHT NOW"
Filial piety is considered extremely important. You are supposed to honor your parents and take care of them. Every year there is the Qingming Festival during which you are supposed to go to your ancestral shrine and honor your ancestors. You must have children (and at least one son to carry on the family name) so that they can take perform those duties for your ancestors and yourself once you have died. Having a son was historically considered so important that it was common for childless men to adopt a nephew if a brother had a "spare" son.
Confucianism seems pretty good, Xi would do good by seriously tapping into it and not just pay lip service for brand building. Does Confucianism say anything about good and evil? Without understanding the depth and nuance of evil how are you going to know to stop seemingly innocent things before they get out of hand? Taoism is essentially a description of what we Christians know as good and evil, Xi should tap into that as well and get serious about it.
 
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Re Confucianism in today's China : there was a good deal of excitement around the "new Confucianists", a loose group of philosophers from Taiwan, Hong Kong and Mainland China, in the 1980's and 1990s.

Singapore's founder and then paramount leader, Lee Kuan Yew, though a pragmatist, incorporated some aspects of neo-Confucianism in his political toolbox (Singapore being, to my knowledge, the only multicultural country that works).

Xi's predecessor, Hu Jintao explicitly co-opted their ideology, at least partially, when his mandate motto became the creation of an "harmonious society". During Hu's rule, everything was called "harmonious" in China, almost reaching a comical point. But "harmonious society" was clearly a neo-Confucianist concept, as harmony, both between the ruler and the ruled and between a man and his inner passions, is the goal set by Confucius.
Around that time, major Confucius temples (including the one at his birthplace in Shandong) were restored on public funding, with great publicity.

Here's the Confucius temple in Beijing, where the Emperor in person saluted freshly minted scholars who had successfully passed imperial exams (Confucius being the most important topic on the curriculum) :



Complex of temples in Qufu, Shandong province, Confucius' supposed birthplace :



Xi, unfortunately, kinda dropped the ball on the whole neo-Confucianism thing. He prefers the neo-Maoist aesthetics and thinks dressing up today's kids, hooked on social media and pop music as they are, as Red Guards and make them LARP in their schoolyard from time to time will make them more patriotic and faithful to the Communist party, which I personally doubt :

 

Archaic

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Do we know if the reason these ads were pulled was because feminists were upset?

Or could it be because someone realized NJU was using women to lure men to attend for sex, rather than for social/political/career advancement?

You can totally ban feminists from society, and yet also have the position that the nation’s universities should be focused on attracting top talent for ambition and education, and not “come here to get a girlfriend and get laid.”

Chinese universities are not like American universities. They are not 24/7 party hubs that incidentally have classes. There is very little partying and the students have little/no social life. Girls do actually meet their boyfriends in the library, studying for class (“let’s study together” is actually a pickup line that is still used in China, kind of like how it was 50 years ago in the US. Except the boys are usually hoping for long term relationships when they pick these girls up, not one-night stands).

There is not also this culture of getting laid. There is casual sex that happens, but it happens at a much lower rate. A lot of what does happen concentrates around the foreigner areas in the big cities. Most of the men in China are not focused on getting laid. They just want to find a wife and focus on their work.

My guess is this ad campaign was put together by some marketing person who studied abroad in the West and learned that “sex sells”, then came back to China with that mentality.

But that is not really a mentality the Chinese want getting any kind of footing there.
 

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Confucianism seems pretty good, Xi would do good by seriously tapping into it and not just pay lip service for brand building. Does Confucianism say anything about good and evil? Without understanding the depth and nuance of evil how are you going to know to stop seemingly innocent things before they get out of hand? Taoism is essentially a description of what we Christians know as good and evil, Xi should tap into that as well and get serious about it.
There is a concept of "good" and "evil" in Confucianism, but it's a bit less heavy on the morality. The philosophy was developed during the Spring and Autumn period and just before the Warring States period. The Zhou dynasty had gradually lost power to nobles/warlords around the country who started to act more independently. At the start of the Warring States period, they had consolidated into a few large kingdoms which were often at war. A lot of schools and philosophies were developed during the period as a response to the chaos and suffering. Confucius believed that the root of the problem was that people didn't lead virtuous laws and follow proper etiquette. If the local nobles had not usurped power from the Zhou kings, then the country would not have fallen into civil war. Likewise, if the common people had refused to assist the local nobles, their power would have been much smaller. In the state in which Confucius was born, the chaos was so bad that even his local lord was getting his power usurped by local merchants.

According to Confucius, the chaos and evil would be stopped if people followed proper social etiquette and rules. Some of the ancient etiquette can be a bit silly, such as detailing how many music instruments an emperor can have compared to his subjects or how large a carriage a person can own, based on his social rank. But there are also rules about more day to day activity, such as seating people at a table according to age and importance. But even that can get complicated, because it is considered virtuous for a higher ranking individual to pay respects to an elder, even if he is of a lower social rank. Respecting elders is very important, even if they don't belong to your family. If they belong to your family, then you are supposed to consult with them when you make important life decisions.

Everyone except the king had someone above them in the hierarchy and should serve them. In other words, the basic social relationship was that between a superior or "lord" and his subject. Within the family, the father functions as the "lord". Although a lord had authority over those under him, it wasn't a license to act like a tyrant. He was supposed to be a virtuous and wise leader. If everyone knew their place, then there would be harmony and "good" in society.

The way to stop society from falling apart would be to shame and punish people who didn't follow proper etiquette. That's kind of what the social credit system is doing. For example, people are penalized for moving away from their parents, even if they put them in nursing homes. Tourists who behave badly may be banned from travelling again. Dog owners who walk their dogs without leashes or cause problems will have their dogs taken away. On the other hand, people will get rewarded for good behavior with discounts and priority for government programs.

I don't like the social credit system, but it's certainly a way to keep everyone in check and they actually warn people about it.


It's more honest than what we in the West currently face. "Racists" can get totally banned from payment processors, which makes it almost impossible to make a living. And of course the standards are always changing. Even among normies, it's now a joke that having a Twitter account will get you "cancelled" in the future, because you will inevitably write something that will be considered offensive in Current Year + 10.
 

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Xi, unfortunately, kinda dropped the ball on the whole neo-Confucianism thing. He prefers the neo-Maoist aesthetics and thinks dressing up today's kids, hooked on social media and pop music as they are, as Red Guards and make them LARP in their schoolyard from time to time will make them more patriotic and faithful to the Communist party, which I personally doubt
Well, Xi did make a big deal about professing his Confucianism when he took power, which the Jewsmedia covered (and mocked) at the time. Maybe he was just doing it to maintain continuity with Hu's regime, but it seems more likely that if that's the direction the CCP leadership was going in, they would have made sure that Xi was at least semi-serious about it. As far as the Red Guard stuff is concerned, I could see him promoting that in order to maintain at least a little continuity to China's recent past. It's a weird tightrope they have to walk, and having to do it while wrestling with active and aggressive Deepstate/Jewish subversion must make the job that much harder.
 
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