Agreeing With Shitlibs For Wrong Reasons: "Scientists" Push Proposal To Reintroduce Jaguars Along US-Mexico Border

CMcGillicutty

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Fun fact: despite weighing only 200lbs on average, jaguars have the most powerful bite force of any carnivorous mammal on Earth, clocking in at about 1500 PSI, greater than the 1200 PSI bite force of polar bears which can weigh 10x more than a jaguar, and the 950 PSI bite force of the Siberian tiger which can weigh 4x more. Most cat species kill by lunging onto the backs of fleeing prey, and biting down on the nape of the neck, severing the spinal cord (which is why it's a terrible idea to run away from a predatory cat BTW, it signals bon appetite in their mind). Jaguars will employ this tactic as well, but unlike other big cats, they are also known to bite through the skull bone of larger riskier prey, puncturing the brain, instantly disabling their hapless victims. Even the two inch thick skulls of Amazonian alligators are no match:


β€˜America’s Great Cat’ strikes back: Jaguars could be reintroduced to Arizona and New Mexico as a way to β€˜right the wrong’ that led to their disappearance more than 50 years ago
  • A team of 16 conservation biologists want to reintroduce jaguars in the US
  • The cats lived in mountains in Arizona and New Mexico hundreds of years ago
  • Experts say there is a stretch of 2million acres for up to 150 jaguars to live
  • The team is proposing this to rectify the cats disappearing from the US
By Stacy Liberatore For Dailymail.com

Published: 18:41 EDT, 14 May 2021 | Updated: 18:42 EDT, 14 May 2021

A team of scientists have petitioned US Fish and Wildlife Service to reintroduce jaguars to the US in an effort they describe as 'righting a wrong done to America's Great Cat.'

Jaguars roamed the central mountains of Arizona and New Mexico for hundreds of years, but humans drove the animals to local extinction by the mid-20th century.

A new paper, published by 16 conservation biologists, suggests an area in spanning across the states would include two million acres that is suitable for 90 to 150 jaguars.

'The jaguar lived in these mountains long before Americans did,' said Eric Sanderson, WCS Senior Conservation Ecologist and lead author of the study.

'If done collaboratively, reintroduction could enhance the economy of this region and the ecology of this incredible part of jaguar range.'

A team of scientists have petitioned US Fish and Wildlife Service to reintroduce jaguars to the US in an effort they describe as 'righting a wrong done to America's Great Cat

A team of scientists have petitioned US Fish and Wildlife Service to reintroduce jaguars to the US in an effort they describe as 'righting a wrong done to America's Great Cat

The jaguar is listed as endangered in the US, as well as Mexico.

Only seven adult males have been spotted in the wild since 1996 and the last female was killed in 1963 by an Arizona hunter near Big Lake in the White Mountains.


Before colonizers stepped on to the 'New World,' jaguar territory stretched from California down to Texas.

Reports say the last cat in California was killed on Mt. San Jacinto, in Riverside County, sometime in the 1860s.
Jaguars roamed the central mountains of Arizona and New Mexico for hundreds of years, but humans drove the animals to local extinction by the mid-20th century

Jaguars roamed the central mountains of Arizona and New Mexico for hundreds of years, but humans drove the animals to local extinction by the mid-20th century
The jaguar is listed as endangered in the US, as well as Mexico. Only seven adult males have been spotted in the wild since 1996 and the last female was killed in 1963 (pictured) by an Arizona hunter near Big Lake in the White Mountains

The jaguar is listed as endangered in the US, as well as Mexico. Only seven adult males have been spotted in the wild since 1996 and the last female was killed in 1963 (pictured) by an Arizona hunter near Big Lake in the White Mountains

Today, their roam Central America through South America, and as far south as northern Argentina with the core population living in the Amazon River basin.

However, a narrow band of occupied jaguar habitat runs north through Mexico and stretches into the US – and some sightings have been reported.

'Our world's natural heritage is diminished nearly everywhere; here is a model for who, where, how and why people should invest in restoring it,' reads the For the jaguar, America's Great Cat, the question is when.'

The more than a dozen researchers aim to convince the US Fish and Wild Service to take a second look at a 2018 recover plan of the jaguar.

That plan considered only habitat south of Interstate Highway 10 (an artificial boundary considering historic jaguar records north of that) and therefore concluded there was habitat for only six jaguars.

The two million acres of land had not been mentioned in the previous proposal, which sits to the north, widening the territory for large cats.

'The jaguar lived in these mountains long before Americans did,' said Eric Sanderson, WCS Senior Conservation Ecologist and lead author of the study. 'If done collaboratively, reintroduction could enhance the economy of this region and the ecology of this incredible part of jaguar range.'

The paper lays out key aspects of why and how these animals could thrive in the mountains once again.

A new paper suggests an area in spanning across the states would include two million acres that is suitable for 90 to 150 jaguars.  The region still bears the same ecosystem from when the cats roamed free, along with a large population of potential prey

A new paper suggests an area in spanning across the states would include two million acres that is suitable for 90 to 150 jaguars. The region still bears the same ecosystem from when the cats roamed free, along with a large population of potential prey

The region still bears the same ecosystem from when the cats roamed free, along with a large population of potential prey.

'Given its elevation and latitude, it may provide an important climate refuge for the species in the future, though further research is required,' the team wrote.

A majority of land is managed for public good and is only home to 381,000 people who live mostly in the cities and town, not near the forested areas.

Also in this area are two tribal nations, the White Mountain Apache and the San Carlos Apache, which manage nearly 12 percent.

The paper provides an example of tribes recovering Mexican wolves in 1998.

Eleven wolves were reintroduced that grew to 163 individuals in 37 packs.

'This represents a turning point for this iconic wild cat, identifying a path forward for restoration of the jaguar to its historic range in the United States,' said Sharon Wilcox Ph.D., Texas Representative for Defenders of Wildlife.

'It should serve as the starting point for a renewed conversation among stakeholders.'
 

Jim Hansen

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This is part of the plan to create the human no-go wildlands. They (UN Agenda 21, Biodiversity Plan, etc.) specifically have planned to put large carnivores in the wildlands - this is to incentivize humans from trying to escape the megacities that are like islands in the wildlands.
 

Sputnik

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This is part of the plan to create the human no-go wildlands. They (UN Agenda 21, Biodiversity Plan, etc.) specifically have planned to put large carnivores in the wildlands - this is to incentivize humans from trying to escape the megacities that are like islands in the wildlands.
Some of us would far rather live among the four legged predators than alongside the Jew or nog. Bring it on.
 

Individualist

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It’s funny how the extreme left and right agree on certain fact patterns that people in the middle are blind to.

Exhibit A: the United States was founded as an explicitly white nationalist nation
 

Aquafina

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JAG-WAR
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JAG-YEW-AR
 

Quest 4 The Future

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"Scientists" Push Proposal To Reintroduce Jaguars Along US-Mexico Border
Arizona has always had "a little touch of Africa" in its scenery and animals. Much of it resembles parts of South Africa, in fact, like this landscape in southern Arizona:
Which is why the disappearance of the Arizona spotted jaguar was a tragic loss:
But there was another "touch of Africa" in southern Arizona as well, called the "Thick-Billed Parrot" - which was native to Arizona before hunters wiped it out, although it is still occasionally seen when specimens nesting in Mexico fly into Arizona. As with the spotted Arizona jaguar, wildlife managers want to reintroduce nesting Thick-Billed Parrots into Southern Arizona, like the one shown below:
 

PotstickerSwatstika

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I saw a jaguar in Mexico when I was a kid. One dashed through our headlights in the middle of a hot night on a rickety dirt road twisting through a dark forest.

That same night we came upon a giant mansion on the water, totally lit up inside, nice cars filling the massive courtyard surrounded by a high wall with spotlights all along it shining out onto a huge, bizarre field of spiky conch shells all the way to the tree line.

Weird vibes.

We concluded it had to be cartel, so we kept driving through the night looking for a safe place to sleep... with a truck following us at a discreet distance the whole time with it’s lights off.
 

Saint Bridget

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Wh
I saw a jaguar in Mexico when I was a kid. One dashed through our headlights in the middle of a hot night on a rickety dirt road twisting through a dark forest.

That same night we came upon a giant mansion on the water, totally lit up inside, nice cars filling the massive courtyard surrounded by a high wall with spotlights all along it shining out onto a huge, bizarre field of spiky conch shells all the way to the tree line.

Weird vibes.

We concluded it had to be cartel, so we kept driving through the night looking for a safe place to sleep... with a truck following us at a discreet distance the whole time with it’s lights off.
What? Are you John Connor or something? What the hell were you doing on rickety roads in mehico? as a kid ! Sounds dangerous.
 

8Man

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a path forward for restoration of the jaguar to its historic range in the United States
Yes, but only in conjunction with funding for Spanish-language 'public service announcements' to run in Mexico reminding would-be illegal migrants to "avoid approaching or attempting to feed the hungry jaguars".
 

angry_panda

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Reintroducing Jaguars? Bad idea, they spend more time in the garage than on the road. Total hangar queens.
 

Trilobite

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Jaguars were formerly present in the Southern Appalachian Mountains. This is the very same region that has an over-population of wild pigs.
 
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