⚠️MEGATHREAD: DEREK CHAUVIN TRIAL-🚨JURY FINDS CHAUVIN GUILTY ON ALL 3 COUNTS

JR_Rustler_III

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Robert Barnes discussed the closing arguments a couple hours ago, and did a nice job summarizing the entire trial.


He concludes:

• The defense in general did a very good job building their defense on the facts, and the law.
• The prosecution mostly did a bad job. They didn't build a legal case, rather, they built a case around the media narratives, with naked appeals to emotion over logic and reason
• If Chauvin is convicted, it will probably be declared a mistrial on appeal
• Based on what he knows about the jury, Barnes still thinks that they'll come in with guilty verdict on at least one of the counts, but says that the defense definitely moved the needle in the right direction, and there is a chance for full acquittal

It's worth a listen.
 

Nexus-9

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Jurors #96 and #118 were dismissed as alternates. The rest are currently deliberating
View attachment 52437
THIS GRAPHIC IS INCORRECT! Juror number 2 may have White skin but he is a JEW



JUROR NO. 2
Juror No. 2 is a white man in his 20s who works as a chemist. With a combined degree in environmental studies and chemistry, he works in a lab where he tests samples for contaminants that may be harmful to the environment or worker hygiene. He said he enjoys outdoor activities, including Ultimate Frisbee, backpacking and biking. He and his fiancee visited George Floyd Square because Floyd’s arrest was such a “transformative event for that area.”
Juror No. 2 said he worked for seven or eight summers at a camp through his childhood synagogue. He considers himself to be a logical thinker, and is the only juror on the panel who said he has never seen bystander video of Floyd’s arrest.

JUROR NO. 9
Juror No. 9 is a multiracial woman in her 20s who has Type 1 diabetes. She grew up in northern Minnesota and has an uncle who is a police officer in that area. She described herself as a “go-with-the-flow, open-minded type of person” and said she was “super excited” to get her jury notice.
She said she only watched the bystander video once, and it gave her a “somewhat negative” impression of Chauvin. She said “that video just makes you sad. Nobody wants to see somebody die, whether it was his fault or not.” She said there could be other possible explanations for Chauvin’s actions, suggesting that Floyd might have been resisting, or civilian lives may have been in danger.

JUROR NO. 19
Juror No. 19 is a white man in his 30s. He is an auditor who said he tries to resolve conflict and make decisions based on facts, not emotions. He has a friend who is a canine officer with the Minneapolis Police Department.
He said he supports Black Lives Matter as a general concept but disagrees with some of the ways group members go about things. He has an unfavorable opinion of Blue Lives Matter. He wrote in his questionnaire that he heard Floyd was on hard drugs, but said he doesn’t believe it should have much impact on the case. “Whether you are under the influence of drugs doesn’t determine whether you should be living or dead,” he said.

JUROR NO. 27
Juror No. 27 is a Black man in his 30s who immigrated to America more than 14 years ago. He went to school in Nebraska and moved to Minnesota in 2012. He manages eight people at his job in IT security, and speaks multiple languages including French. He and his wife have a dog but no children. He is a big Minnesota Gophers fan and loves the Vikings.
He said he had a somewhat negative view of Chauvin, based on clips of bystander video he saw on TV. He said he talked with his wife about Floyd’s death: “We talked about how it could have been me, or anyone else,” he said. Juror No. 27 said he hoped to learn at trial more about events that led up to Floyd’s arrest.

JUROR NO. 44
Juror No. 44 is a white woman in her 50s, a single mom of two teenage boys. She is an executive in the nonprofit sector, working in health care advocacy. She said she had prior professional dealings with Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison in her job, but said it would not affect her impartiality.
She said she was exposed to a lot of news about this case, adding that the media is biased and doesn’t have all the facts. She saw only part of the bystander video and said she has empathy for both Floyd and Chauvin. She said she had a somewhat negative view of Chauvin and a neutral opinion of Floyd, saying he was not a model citizen but didn’t “deserve to die.”
She said she strongly agrees that the criminal justice system is biased against racial and ethnic minorities. “Not all police are bad,” she said. “I don’t want them terrorized or disrespected. But bad police need to go.”

JUROR NO. 52
Juror No. 52 is a Black man in his 30s. He described himself as a friendly, positive person. He works in banking and likes sports, especially basketball. He coaches youth sports and writes creatively for a hobby, including scripts and poetry.
He said he had neutral opinions on Chauvin and Floyd. He said he had not seen the bystander video in its entirety but had seen clips of it two or three times. He said he had not posted about it on social media but had talked with family and friends and he wrote in his questionnaire that his opinion has been “why didn’t the other officers stop Chauvin.”
“I don’t know if he was doing something wrong or not, but somebody died … Even if you have no intention of doing something and something happens, somebody could’ve still intervened and prevented that,” he said. He has a very favorable view of Black Lives Matter, saying, “Black lives just want to be treated as equals and not killed or treated in an aggressive manner simply because they are Black.”

JUROR NO. 55
Juror No. 55 is a white woman in her 50s who is a single parent of two children. Her youngest is a teenager. She works as an executive assistant at a health care clinic and sells Pampered Chef. She enjoys riding motorcycles, saying she picked it up because her late husband was interested in it and she rides with him now “in the spirit.”
She said she was “disturbed” by the bystander video and “I just couldn’t watch it anymore.” She said she has a somewhat unfavorable view of Chauvin because she feels he could’ve handled the situation differently. Still, she said she wouldn’t be able to form an opinion until she has all of the facts. She has a basic trust in police officers, and a somewhat unfavorable view of Black Lives Matter, saying: “All lives matter to me. It doesn’t matter who they are or what they are.”

JUROR NO. 79
Juror No. 79 is a Black man in his 40s, a father who works in management and has lived in the Twin Cities area for about two decades after immigrating to America. He said he lives in a suburb and his home was burglarized once and police responded appropriately, even though the suspect was never caught.
He said he trusts police, but also feels it’s appropriate for jurors to evaluate an officer’s actions. “I would say it’s another pair of eyes and a new mind just looking at the action,” he said. He has a son about to take driver’s education. He said he would tell his son that when police stop him, he should cooperate. When asked if people who don’t cooperate have themselves to blame, he said: “Cooperation is good. … You help everybody.”

JUROR NO. 85
Juror No. 85 is a multiracial woman in her 40s, who is married and has a small child. She grew up in a river town and attended college in western Wisconsin. She is a consultant who helps companies with reorganizations and other transitions.
She said she has a neutral view of Floyd, writing in her questionnaire that she knew he died “as a result of this encounter” but did not know what his actions were before it happened. When pressed if she thought Chauvin was responsible, she said: “No, I never heard what a cause of death was.”
She said she has a pretty strong faith in police, but that they are human and can make mistakes. She said she would generally agree that if someone does not cooperate, he or she might have themselves to blame. “You respect police and you do what they ask,” she said.

JUROR NO. 89
Juror No. 89 is a white woman in her 50s who lives in a suburb. She is a registered nurse currently working with patients on ventilators, including those with COVID-19, and has prior experience in cardiac care.
She was questioned extensively about her experience as a nurse, whether she has ever resuscitated anyone and how she would view medical evidence in the case. The woman said she would draw upon her knowledge to evaluate medical testimony, but said she would refrain from using her knowledge in the jury room.
She said she somewhat disagrees that it’s not right to second-guess decisions officers make.

JUROR NO. 91
Juror No. 91 is a Black woman in her 60s. She is a grandmother of two who studied child psychology and worked in marketing before she retired, and she felt strongly that being on a jury was her civic duty. The woman, who volunteers with underserved youth, said she watched the bystander video of Floyd’s arrest for about four or five minutes, then shut it off because “it just wasn’t something that I needed to see.”
She grew up about 10 or 15 blocks from the site of Floyd’s arrest, but said she moved decades ago and has no reason to revisit the area. She had a very favorable view of Black Lives Matter, writing in her questionnaire “I am Black and my life matters,” though she said she is not familiar with the organization. She has a relative who is a Minneapolis police officer.

JUROR NO. 92
Juror No. 92 is a white woman in her 40s who works in the commercial insurance business.
She said she has experience with someone who struggled with alcohol, and might view someone who uses drugs with caution, out of fear they could act violently or aggressively when under the influence. Still, she said, she doesn’t agree that someone who uses drugs or doesn’t cooperate with police should be treated poorly. “If someone uses drugs, I don’t think there should be ramifications of violence for that,” she said.
 

nfffku

Well-known member
Cave Beast
Robert Barnes discussed the closing arguments a couple hours ago, and did a nice job summarizing the entire trial.


He concludes:

• The defense in general did a very good job building their defense on the facts, and the law.
• The prosecution mostly did a bad job. They didn't build a legal case, rather, they built a case around the media narratives, with naked appeals to emotion over logic and reason
• If Chauvin is convicted, it will probably be declared a mistrial on appeal
• Based on what he knows about the jury, Barnes still thinks that they'll come in with guilty verdict on at least one of the counts, but says that the defense definitely moved the needle in the right direction, and there is a chance for full acquittal

It's worth a listen.
Watched almost the whole thing and I thought it was pretty good. Learned a lot about what has been going on in the trial without having to watch it.

My only complaint is the frizzy haired guy was pretty jewy and seemed to have an issue with Chauvin in general. But he was pretty good at not digging into his bias and discussing the issues fairly reasonably.

Thanks for sharing. I’ll have to check more of these out.
 

nfffku

Well-known member
Cave Beast
THIS GRAPHIC IS INCORRECT! Juror number 2 may have White skin but he is a JEW



JUROR NO. 2
Juror No. 2 is a white man in his 20s who works as a chemist. With a combined degree in environmental studies and chemistry, he works in a lab where he tests samples for contaminants that may be harmful to the environment or worker hygiene. He said he enjoys outdoor activities, including Ultimate Frisbee, backpacking and biking. He and his fiancee visited George Floyd Square because Floyd’s arrest was such a “transformative event for that area.”
Juror No. 2 said he worked for seven or eight summers at a camp through his childhood synagogue. He considers himself to be a logical thinker, and is the only juror on the panel who said he has never seen bystander video of Floyd’s arrest.

JUROR NO. 9
Juror No. 9 is a multiracial woman in her 20s who has Type 1 diabetes. She grew up in northern Minnesota and has an uncle who is a police officer in that area. She described herself as a “go-with-the-flow, open-minded type of person” and said she was “super excited” to get her jury notice.
She said she only watched the bystander video once, and it gave her a “somewhat negative” impression of Chauvin. She said “that video just makes you sad. Nobody wants to see somebody die, whether it was his fault or not.” She said there could be other possible explanations for Chauvin’s actions, suggesting that Floyd might have been resisting, or civilian lives may have been in danger.

JUROR NO. 19
Juror No. 19 is a white man in his 30s. He is an auditor who said he tries to resolve conflict and make decisions based on facts, not emotions. He has a friend who is a canine officer with the Minneapolis Police Department.
He said he supports Black Lives Matter as a general concept but disagrees with some of the ways group members go about things. He has an unfavorable opinion of Blue Lives Matter. He wrote in his questionnaire that he heard Floyd was on hard drugs, but said he doesn’t believe it should have much impact on the case. “Whether you are under the influence of drugs doesn’t determine whether you should be living or dead,” he said.

JUROR NO. 27
Juror No. 27 is a Black man in his 30s who immigrated to America more than 14 years ago. He went to school in Nebraska and moved to Minnesota in 2012. He manages eight people at his job in IT security, and speaks multiple languages including French. He and his wife have a dog but no children. He is a big Minnesota Gophers fan and loves the Vikings.
He said he had a somewhat negative view of Chauvin, based on clips of bystander video he saw on TV. He said he talked with his wife about Floyd’s death: “We talked about how it could have been me, or anyone else,” he said. Juror No. 27 said he hoped to learn at trial more about events that led up to Floyd’s arrest.

JUROR NO. 44
Juror No. 44 is a white woman in her 50s, a single mom of two teenage boys. She is an executive in the nonprofit sector, working in health care advocacy. She said she had prior professional dealings with Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison in her job, but said it would not affect her impartiality.
She said she was exposed to a lot of news about this case, adding that the media is biased and doesn’t have all the facts. She saw only part of the bystander video and said she has empathy for both Floyd and Chauvin. She said she had a somewhat negative view of Chauvin and a neutral opinion of Floyd, saying he was not a model citizen but didn’t “deserve to die.”
She said she strongly agrees that the criminal justice system is biased against racial and ethnic minorities. “Not all police are bad,” she said. “I don’t want them terrorized or disrespected. But bad police need to go.”

JUROR NO. 52
Juror No. 52 is a Black man in his 30s. He described himself as a friendly, positive person. He works in banking and likes sports, especially basketball. He coaches youth sports and writes creatively for a hobby, including scripts and poetry.
He said he had neutral opinions on Chauvin and Floyd. He said he had not seen the bystander video in its entirety but had seen clips of it two or three times. He said he had not posted about it on social media but had talked with family and friends and he wrote in his questionnaire that his opinion has been “why didn’t the other officers stop Chauvin.”
“I don’t know if he was doing something wrong or not, but somebody died … Even if you have no intention of doing something and something happens, somebody could’ve still intervened and prevented that,” he said. He has a very favorable view of Black Lives Matter, saying, “Black lives just want to be treated as equals and not killed or treated in an aggressive manner simply because they are Black.”

JUROR NO. 55
Juror No. 55 is a white woman in her 50s who is a single parent of two children. Her youngest is a teenager. She works as an executive assistant at a health care clinic and sells Pampered Chef. She enjoys riding motorcycles, saying she picked it up because her late husband was interested in it and she rides with him now “in the spirit.”
She said she was “disturbed” by the bystander video and “I just couldn’t watch it anymore.” She said she has a somewhat unfavorable view of Chauvin because she feels he could’ve handled the situation differently. Still, she said she wouldn’t be able to form an opinion until she has all of the facts. She has a basic trust in police officers, and a somewhat unfavorable view of Black Lives Matter, saying: “All lives matter to me. It doesn’t matter who they are or what they are.”

JUROR NO. 79
Juror No. 79 is a Black man in his 40s, a father who works in management and has lived in the Twin Cities area for about two decades after immigrating to America. He said he lives in a suburb and his home was burglarized once and police responded appropriately, even though the suspect was never caught.
He said he trusts police, but also feels it’s appropriate for jurors to evaluate an officer’s actions. “I would say it’s another pair of eyes and a new mind just looking at the action,” he said. He has a son about to take driver’s education. He said he would tell his son that when police stop him, he should cooperate. When asked if people who don’t cooperate have themselves to blame, he said: “Cooperation is good. … You help everybody.”

JUROR NO. 85
Juror No. 85 is a multiracial woman in her 40s, who is married and has a small child. She grew up in a river town and attended college in western Wisconsin. She is a consultant who helps companies with reorganizations and other transitions.
She said she has a neutral view of Floyd, writing in her questionnaire that she knew he died “as a result of this encounter” but did not know what his actions were before it happened. When pressed if she thought Chauvin was responsible, she said: “No, I never heard what a cause of death was.”
She said she has a pretty strong faith in police, but that they are human and can make mistakes. She said she would generally agree that if someone does not cooperate, he or she might have themselves to blame. “You respect police and you do what they ask,” she said.

JUROR NO. 89
Juror No. 89 is a white woman in her 50s who lives in a suburb. She is a registered nurse currently working with patients on ventilators, including those with COVID-19, and has prior experience in cardiac care.
She was questioned extensively about her experience as a nurse, whether she has ever resuscitated anyone and how she would view medical evidence in the case. The woman said she would draw upon her knowledge to evaluate medical testimony, but said she would refrain from using her knowledge in the jury room.
She said she somewhat disagrees that it’s not right to second-guess decisions officers make.

JUROR NO. 91
Juror No. 91 is a Black woman in her 60s. She is a grandmother of two who studied child psychology and worked in marketing before she retired, and she felt strongly that being on a jury was her civic duty. The woman, who volunteers with underserved youth, said she watched the bystander video of Floyd’s arrest for about four or five minutes, then shut it off because “it just wasn’t something that I needed to see.”
She grew up about 10 or 15 blocks from the site of Floyd’s arrest, but said she moved decades ago and has no reason to revisit the area. She had a very favorable view of Black Lives Matter, writing in her questionnaire “I am Black and my life matters,” though she said she is not familiar with the organization. She has a relative who is a Minneapolis police officer.

JUROR NO. 92
Juror No. 92 is a white woman in her 40s who works in the commercial insurance business.
She said she has experience with someone who struggled with alcohol, and might view someone who uses drugs with caution, out of fear they could act violently or aggressively when under the influence. Still, she said, she doesn’t agree that someone who uses drugs or doesn’t cooperate with police should be treated poorly. “If someone uses drugs, I don’t think there should be ramifications of violence for that,” she said.
When you read this stuff you realize how fake and gay the jury system is.

Look, people lie constantly about their real feelings and intentions for social compatibility reasons. It is very doubtful the people on this jury will act as to how they described themselves in their profiles.

For instance, does anyone really believe that the nurse bitch isn’t going to bring her experience to bear in jury room? She’s a semi-expert in general medical information and the only immediate resource of said information in the jury room. Even if she doesn’t explicitly say, “well I’m a nurse so blah blah blah,” the other jurors will be influenced by her opinion.

Also, does anyone believe the niggers on this jury are not going to want to instinctively side with Floyd? If they use emotionally manipulative language in the jury room (I.e. insinuating someone who wouldn’t vote to convict Chauvin must be a racist) they will have a lot of power over the direction the jury will go.

Frankly, this case doesn’t need a jury because there is an abundance of evidence that shows Chauvin’s actions did not contribute to Floyd’s death. Just the toxicology report alone proves that Floyd’s health was so compromised by the drugs he ingested that the cops can’t be reasonably liable if he died in almost any manner. Let alone the fact that the autopsy proved that there was no evidence of mechanical occlusion of his cardio vascular system.

The most reasonable thing would be to have a panel of legal and medical experts review the information and submit a report on if Chauvin’s actions contributed to, or directly caused, Floyd’s death. And given the advanced state of deterioration Floyd’s health was in, unless there is specific, verifiable evidence that Chauvin directly caused Floyd’s death, the whole thing should be thrown out. Otherwise you are just flipping around in a grey area, trying to use word games to manipulate the scenario in one direction or the other.
 

JR_Rustler_III

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My only complaint is the frizzy haired guy was pretty jewy and seemed to have an issue with Chauvin in general. But he was pretty good at not digging into his bias and discussing the issues fairly reasonably.
Frei is an orthodox Jew and a former-attorney-turned-YouTube-grifter. I'm not sure how or why Barnes teamed up with him, but whatever. At least Frei has the good sense to stay out of Barnes' way most of the time.
 

nfffku

Well-known member
Cave Beast
Frei is an orthodox Jew and a former-attorney-turned-YouTube-grifter. I'm not sure how or why Barnes teamed up with him, but whatever. At least Frei has the good sense to stay out of Barnes' way most of the time.
Yeah I figured he was some kind of heeb with than hooky nose, the gay glasses, and effeminate manner.

Also, are the people whose comments come up on screen paying to have those comments visible? There was some kind of dollar amount next to each one and I figured it must mean they paid to have their comment displayed. Which, if true, would be one of the jewyist grifts I’ve ever heard of. It’s like Only Fans for YouTube comments.
 

JR_Rustler_III

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Also, are the people whose comments come up on screen paying to have those comments visible? There was some kind of dollar amount next to each one and I figured it must mean they paid to have their comment displayed. Which, if true, would be one of the jewyist grifts I’ve ever heard of. It’s like Only Fans for YouTube comments.
Those are YouTube superchats. I guess you don't spend much time on YouTube livestreams? It's a pretty normal thing now, but yeah--it's a grift.

While Barnes is talking, if you look at Frei you'll see he's monitoring the chat to bring up questions and comments he wants everyone to see. Obviously if you pay money for a superchat he's more likely to showcase your question/comment, but in fairness he does bring up some unpaid comments as well.
 

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Destructive Ceremonious Master
Minnesota Awaits Derek Chauvin’s Fate as Jury Begins Deliberations
Last Updated
April 20, 2021
The jury deliberated for four hours on Monday after closing arguments, during which the prosecution and the defense painted different pictures of George Floyd’s death.

 

jj72

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THIS GRAPHIC IS INCORRECT! Juror number 2 may have White skin but he is a JEW



JUROR NO. 2
Juror No. 2 is a white man in his 20s who works as a chemist. With a combined degree in environmental studies and chemistry, he works in a lab where he tests samples for contaminants that may be harmful to the environment or worker hygiene. He said he enjoys outdoor activities, including Ultimate Frisbee, backpacking and biking. He and his fiancee visited George Floyd Square because Floyd’s arrest was such a “transformative event for that area.”
Juror No. 2 said he worked for seven or eight summers at a camp through his childhood synagogue. He considers himself to be a logical thinker, and is the only juror on the panel who said he has never seen bystander video of Floyd’s arrest.

JUROR NO. 9
Juror No. 9 is a multiracial woman in her 20s who has Type 1 diabetes. She grew up in northern Minnesota and has an uncle who is a police officer in that area. She described herself as a “go-with-the-flow, open-minded type of person” and said she was “super excited” to get her jury notice.
She said she only watched the bystander video once, and it gave her a “somewhat negative” impression of Chauvin. She said “that video just makes you sad. Nobody wants to see somebody die, whether it was his fault or not.” She said there could be other possible explanations for Chauvin’s actions, suggesting that Floyd might have been resisting, or civilian lives may have been in danger.

JUROR NO. 19
Juror No. 19 is a white man in his 30s. He is an auditor who said he tries to resolve conflict and make decisions based on facts, not emotions. He has a friend who is a canine officer with the Minneapolis Police Department.
He said he supports Black Lives Matter as a general concept but disagrees with some of the ways group members go about things. He has an unfavorable opinion of Blue Lives Matter. He wrote in his questionnaire that he heard Floyd was on hard drugs, but said he doesn’t believe it should have much impact on the case. “Whether you are under the influence of drugs doesn’t determine whether you should be living or dead,” he said.

JUROR NO. 27
Juror No. 27 is a Black man in his 30s who immigrated to America more than 14 years ago. He went to school in Nebraska and moved to Minnesota in 2012. He manages eight people at his job in IT security, and speaks multiple languages including French. He and his wife have a dog but no children. He is a big Minnesota Gophers fan and loves the Vikings.
He said he had a somewhat negative view of Chauvin, based on clips of bystander video he saw on TV. He said he talked with his wife about Floyd’s death: “We talked about how it could have been me, or anyone else,” he said. Juror No. 27 said he hoped to learn at trial more about events that led up to Floyd’s arrest.

JUROR NO. 44
Juror No. 44 is a white woman in her 50s, a single mom of two teenage boys. She is an executive in the nonprofit sector, working in health care advocacy. She said she had prior professional dealings with Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison in her job, but said it would not affect her impartiality.
She said she was exposed to a lot of news about this case, adding that the media is biased and doesn’t have all the facts. She saw only part of the bystander video and said she has empathy for both Floyd and Chauvin. She said she had a somewhat negative view of Chauvin and a neutral opinion of Floyd, saying he was not a model citizen but didn’t “deserve to die.”
She said she strongly agrees that the criminal justice system is biased against racial and ethnic minorities. “Not all police are bad,” she said. “I don’t want them terrorized or disrespected. But bad police need to go.”

JUROR NO. 52
Juror No. 52 is a Black man in his 30s. He described himself as a friendly, positive person. He works in banking and likes sports, especially basketball. He coaches youth sports and writes creatively for a hobby, including scripts and poetry.
He said he had neutral opinions on Chauvin and Floyd. He said he had not seen the bystander video in its entirety but had seen clips of it two or three times. He said he had not posted about it on social media but had talked with family and friends and he wrote in his questionnaire that his opinion has been “why didn’t the other officers stop Chauvin.”
“I don’t know if he was doing something wrong or not, but somebody died … Even if you have no intention of doing something and something happens, somebody could’ve still intervened and prevented that,” he said. He has a very favorable view of Black Lives Matter, saying, “Black lives just want to be treated as equals and not killed or treated in an aggressive manner simply because they are Black.”

JUROR NO. 55
Juror No. 55 is a white woman in her 50s who is a single parent of two children. Her youngest is a teenager. She works as an executive assistant at a health care clinic and sells Pampered Chef. She enjoys riding motorcycles, saying she picked it up because her late husband was interested in it and she rides with him now “in the spirit.”
She said she was “disturbed” by the bystander video and “I just couldn’t watch it anymore.” She said she has a somewhat unfavorable view of Chauvin because she feels he could’ve handled the situation differently. Still, she said she wouldn’t be able to form an opinion until she has all of the facts. She has a basic trust in police officers, and a somewhat unfavorable view of Black Lives Matter, saying: “All lives matter to me. It doesn’t matter who they are or what they are.”

JUROR NO. 79
Juror No. 79 is a Black man in his 40s, a father who works in management and has lived in the Twin Cities area for about two decades after immigrating to America. He said he lives in a suburb and his home was burglarized once and police responded appropriately, even though the suspect was never caught.
He said he trusts police, but also feels it’s appropriate for jurors to evaluate an officer’s actions. “I would say it’s another pair of eyes and a new mind just looking at the action,” he said. He has a son about to take driver’s education. He said he would tell his son that when police stop him, he should cooperate. When asked if people who don’t cooperate have themselves to blame, he said: “Cooperation is good. … You help everybody.”

JUROR NO. 85
Juror No. 85 is a multiracial woman in her 40s, who is married and has a small child. She grew up in a river town and attended college in western Wisconsin. She is a consultant who helps companies with reorganizations and other transitions.
She said she has a neutral view of Floyd, writing in her questionnaire that she knew he died “as a result of this encounter” but did not know what his actions were before it happened. When pressed if she thought Chauvin was responsible, she said: “No, I never heard what a cause of death was.”
She said she has a pretty strong faith in police, but that they are human and can make mistakes. She said she would generally agree that if someone does not cooperate, he or she might have themselves to blame. “You respect police and you do what they ask,” she said.

JUROR NO. 89
Juror No. 89 is a white woman in her 50s who lives in a suburb. She is a registered nurse currently working with patients on ventilators, including those with COVID-19, and has prior experience in cardiac care.
She was questioned extensively about her experience as a nurse, whether she has ever resuscitated anyone and how she would view medical evidence in the case. The woman said she would draw upon her knowledge to evaluate medical testimony, but said she would refrain from using her knowledge in the jury room.
She said she somewhat disagrees that it’s not right to second-guess decisions officers make.

JUROR NO. 91
Juror No. 91 is a Black woman in her 60s. She is a grandmother of two who studied child psychology and worked in marketing before she retired, and she felt strongly that being on a jury was her civic duty. The woman, who volunteers with underserved youth, said she watched the bystander video of Floyd’s arrest for about four or five minutes, then shut it off because “it just wasn’t something that I needed to see.”
She grew up about 10 or 15 blocks from the site of Floyd’s arrest, but said she moved decades ago and has no reason to revisit the area. She had a very favorable view of Black Lives Matter, writing in her questionnaire “I am Black and my life matters,” though she said she is not familiar with the organization. She has a relative who is a Minneapolis police officer.

JUROR NO. 92
Juror No. 92 is a white woman in her 40s who works in the commercial insurance business.
She said she has experience with someone who struggled with alcohol, and might view someone who uses drugs with caution, out of fear they could act violently or aggressively when under the influence. Still, she said, she doesn’t agree that someone who uses drugs or doesn’t cooperate with police should be treated poorly. “If someone uses drugs, I don’t think there should be ramifications of violence for that,” she said.
Why do they write 'black' with a capital B but 'white' with a lower-case W?
 

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Why do they write 'black' with a capital B but 'white' with a lower-case W?
 

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🚨Governor declares state of emergency in Minnesota as Derek Chauvin verdict nears; police reinforcements from Ohio, Nebraska called in
 

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THIS GRAPHIC IS INCORRECT! Juror number 2 may have White skin but he is a JEW



JUROR NO. 2
Juror No. 2 is a white man in his 20s who works as a chemist. With a combined degree in environmental studies and chemistry, he works in a lab where he tests samples for contaminants that may be harmful to the environment or worker hygiene. He said he enjoys outdoor activities, including Ultimate Frisbee, backpacking and biking. He and his fiancee visited George Floyd Square because Floyd’s arrest was such a “transformative event for that area.”
Juror No. 2 said he worked for seven or eight summers at a camp through his childhood synagogue. He considers himself to be a logical thinker, and is the only juror on the panel who said he has never seen bystander video of Floyd’s arrest.

JUROR NO. 9
Juror No. 9 is a multiracial woman in her 20s who has Type 1 diabetes. She grew up in northern Minnesota and has an uncle who is a police officer in that area. She described herself as a “go-with-the-flow, open-minded type of person” and said she was “super excited” to get her jury notice.
She said she only watched the bystander video once, and it gave her a “somewhat negative” impression of Chauvin. She said “that video just makes you sad. Nobody wants to see somebody die, whether it was his fault or not.” She said there could be other possible explanations for Chauvin’s actions, suggesting that Floyd might have been resisting, or civilian lives may have been in danger.

JUROR NO. 19
Juror No. 19 is a white man in his 30s. He is an auditor who said he tries to resolve conflict and make decisions based on facts, not emotions. He has a friend who is a canine officer with the Minneapolis Police Department.
He said he supports Black Lives Matter as a general concept but disagrees with some of the ways group members go about things. He has an unfavorable opinion of Blue Lives Matter. He wrote in his questionnaire that he heard Floyd was on hard drugs, but said he doesn’t believe it should have much impact on the case. “Whether you are under the influence of drugs doesn’t determine whether you should be living or dead,” he said.

JUROR NO. 27
Juror No. 27 is a Black man in his 30s who immigrated to America more than 14 years ago. He went to school in Nebraska and moved to Minnesota in 2012. He manages eight people at his job in IT security, and speaks multiple languages including French. He and his wife have a dog but no children. He is a big Minnesota Gophers fan and loves the Vikings.
He said he had a somewhat negative view of Chauvin, based on clips of bystander video he saw on TV. He said he talked with his wife about Floyd’s death: “We talked about how it could have been me, or anyone else,” he said. Juror No. 27 said he hoped to learn at trial more about events that led up to Floyd’s arrest.

JUROR NO. 44
Juror No. 44 is a white woman in her 50s, a single mom of two teenage boys. She is an executive in the nonprofit sector, working in health care advocacy. She said she had prior professional dealings with Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison in her job, but said it would not affect her impartiality.
She said she was exposed to a lot of news about this case, adding that the media is biased and doesn’t have all the facts. She saw only part of the bystander video and said she has empathy for both Floyd and Chauvin. She said she had a somewhat negative view of Chauvin and a neutral opinion of Floyd, saying he was not a model citizen but didn’t “deserve to die.”
She said she strongly agrees that the criminal justice system is biased against racial and ethnic minorities. “Not all police are bad,” she said. “I don’t want them terrorized or disrespected. But bad police need to go.”

JUROR NO. 52
Juror No. 52 is a Black man in his 30s. He described himself as a friendly, positive person. He works in banking and likes sports, especially basketball. He coaches youth sports and writes creatively for a hobby, including scripts and poetry.
He said he had neutral opinions on Chauvin and Floyd. He said he had not seen the bystander video in its entirety but had seen clips of it two or three times. He said he had not posted about it on social media but had talked with family and friends and he wrote in his questionnaire that his opinion has been “why didn’t the other officers stop Chauvin.”
“I don’t know if he was doing something wrong or not, but somebody died … Even if you have no intention of doing something and something happens, somebody could’ve still intervened and prevented that,” he said. He has a very favorable view of Black Lives Matter, saying, “Black lives just want to be treated as equals and not killed or treated in an aggressive manner simply because they are Black.”

JUROR NO. 55
Juror No. 55 is a white woman in her 50s who is a single parent of two children. Her youngest is a teenager. She works as an executive assistant at a health care clinic and sells Pampered Chef. She enjoys riding motorcycles, saying she picked it up because her late husband was interested in it and she rides with him now “in the spirit.”
She said she was “disturbed” by the bystander video and “I just couldn’t watch it anymore.” She said she has a somewhat unfavorable view of Chauvin because she feels he could’ve handled the situation differently. Still, she said she wouldn’t be able to form an opinion until she has all of the facts. She has a basic trust in police officers, and a somewhat unfavorable view of Black Lives Matter, saying: “All lives matter to me. It doesn’t matter who they are or what they are.”

JUROR NO. 79
Juror No. 79 is a Black man in his 40s, a father who works in management and has lived in the Twin Cities area for about two decades after immigrating to America. He said he lives in a suburb and his home was burglarized once and police responded appropriately, even though the suspect was never caught.
He said he trusts police, but also feels it’s appropriate for jurors to evaluate an officer’s actions. “I would say it’s another pair of eyes and a new mind just looking at the action,” he said. He has a son about to take driver’s education. He said he would tell his son that when police stop him, he should cooperate. When asked if people who don’t cooperate have themselves to blame, he said: “Cooperation is good. … You help everybody.”

JUROR NO. 85
Juror No. 85 is a multiracial woman in her 40s, who is married and has a small child. She grew up in a river town and attended college in western Wisconsin. She is a consultant who helps companies with reorganizations and other transitions.
She said she has a neutral view of Floyd, writing in her questionnaire that she knew he died “as a result of this encounter” but did not know what his actions were before it happened. When pressed if she thought Chauvin was responsible, she said: “No, I never heard what a cause of death was.”
She said she has a pretty strong faith in police, but that they are human and can make mistakes. She said she would generally agree that if someone does not cooperate, he or she might have themselves to blame. “You respect police and you do what they ask,” she said.

JUROR NO. 89
Juror No. 89 is a white woman in her 50s who lives in a suburb. She is a registered nurse currently working with patients on ventilators, including those with COVID-19, and has prior experience in cardiac care.
She was questioned extensively about her experience as a nurse, whether she has ever resuscitated anyone and how she would view medical evidence in the case. The woman said she would draw upon her knowledge to evaluate medical testimony, but said she would refrain from using her knowledge in the jury room.
She said she somewhat disagrees that it’s not right to second-guess decisions officers make.

JUROR NO. 91
Juror No. 91 is a Black woman in her 60s. She is a grandmother of two who studied child psychology and worked in marketing before she retired, and she felt strongly that being on a jury was her civic duty. The woman, who volunteers with underserved youth, said she watched the bystander video of Floyd’s arrest for about four or five minutes, then shut it off because “it just wasn’t something that I needed to see.”
She grew up about 10 or 15 blocks from the site of Floyd’s arrest, but said she moved decades ago and has no reason to revisit the area. She had a very favorable view of Black Lives Matter, writing in her questionnaire “I am Black and my life matters,” though she said she is not familiar with the organization. She has a relative who is a Minneapolis police officer.

JUROR NO. 92
Juror No. 92 is a white woman in her 40s who works in the commercial insurance business.
She said she has experience with someone who struggled with alcohol, and might view someone who uses drugs with caution, out of fear they could act violently or aggressively when under the influence. Still, she said, she doesn’t agree that someone who uses drugs or doesn’t cooperate with police should be treated poorly. “If someone uses drugs, I don’t think there should be ramifications of violence for that,” she said.
This doesn’t look to good for him.
 
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